Classic car owners can prevent new E10 fuel corrosion damage with these simple tools

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Classic car owners can prevent new E10 fuel corrosion damage with these simple tools

Classic car owners can reduce the level of damage to a car and keep their vehicle on the road by simply adding fuel additives to their cars. These

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Classic car owners can reduce the level of damage to a car and keep their vehicle on the road by simply adding fuel additives to their cars. These additives can help lubricate certain areas of the cars and prevent corrosion across key areas of the vehicle. 

Classic Oils says the tool is a unique formula which protects against valve seat recession under all driving conditions. 

Classic Oils claims the stabiliser prevents use of E5 and E10 petrol in classic cars, motorcycles and pre 1996 petrol vehicles. 

They say the liquid will protect against corrosion and keep fuel systems clean when using the new petrol. 

Modern classic vehicles should use other additives which are friendly with catalytic converter devices.

A spokesperson said: “Replacing some engine parts could become more common, however there could be options to use fuel additives. 

“So even if E10 does become the standard, there will be ways and means to keep classic cars on the road.”

Experts have previously warned many owners of modern vehicles may be able to use the new fuel if they have had extensive modifications. 

They say many drivers may have had to replace valve seats and fuel lines with more durable alternatives which may mean E10 can run on their cars. 

However, advanced mechanical alterations could cost motorists anywhere from hundreds to thousands of pounds. 

Department for Transport tests have identified a series of issues with E10 fuels when used in incompatible vehicles. 

Problems include degradation of fuel hoses and seals and blocked fuel filters. 

Carburettors may be corroded, injectors could be blocked and fuel tanks could be damaged with the new fuel. 

The RAC has previously warned up to 600,000 cars may be incompatible with the new petrol when it is launched. 



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