Laura Kuenssberg backlash: How BBC staff fumed at political editor's 'over-the-top' salary

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Laura Kuenssberg backlash: How BBC staff fumed at political editor's 'over-the-top' salary

Ms Kuenssberg is one of the best known names and faces in political reporting. She became something of a mainstay in living rooms across the nation

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Ms Kuenssberg is one of the best known names and faces in political reporting. She became something of a mainstay in living rooms across the nation during the 2010 election, popping up everywhere when given a chance. It was here that she built a name and reputation for herself as the BBC’s chief political correspondent.

By the end of 2011, so ubiquitous was her television presence that the broadcaster was dubbed “Kuenssbergovision”.

After her successful election coverage, Ms Kuenssberg moved to ITV to become the competitor’s business editor.

Yet it was not long before the BBC was calling again.

In 2014, she returned to the corporation in exchange for a hefty pay rise.

Becoming an integral part of the BBC’s flagship political programme, Newsnight, Ms Kuenssberg was put on a salary of £200,000.

In 2015, The Daily Mail described this as having “ruffled feathers among other staff”.

It came at a time when Newsnight was significantly scaling back its resources.

The programme’s average audience had slipped to just 600,000.

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Despite the monetary tension, Ms Kuenssberg went on to excel at the BBC.

She remains an important part of the broadcaster, and was awarded the job of political editor in 2015 – a year after her move back from ITV.

Success appears to run in Ms Kuenssberg’s family.

She was born into a life of riches and privilege, her father a wealthy businessman who had made his fortune in textiles.

He held dozens of senior roles across many of Scotland’s most influential businesses and institutions.

Her mother, meanwhile, was awarded a CBE for services to child welfare and justice through her charity work.

Further back in the family’s lineage, her grandfather, who was a lord – Lord Robertson, a High Court judge who helped to shape Scottish law.

And, her great uncle, Sir James Wilson Robertson, served as the last colonial governor-general of Nigeria.



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