Russia bomb threat: Airport emptied after sickening message triggers mass evacuation

Khabarovsk Novy Airport received an anonymous bomb threat over e-mail. The message claimed there was an explosive planted in the terminal of a domestic airline.

500 people were evacuated from Khabarovsk Novy Airport after the threat.

Staff told them to wait inside buses away from the airport, partially to keep them dry.

Khabarovsk Novy Airport’s press services told Russian media agency TASS passengers can expect serious delays.

They said: “It is expected that seven flights will be delayed.”

MORE TO FOLLOW



Russia bomb threat: Airport emptied after sickening message triggers mass evacuation

Khabarovsk Novy Airport received an anonymous bomb threat over e-mail. The message claimed there was an explosive planted in the terminal of a domestic airline.

500 people were evacuated from Khabarovsk Novy Airport after the threat.

Staff told them to wait inside buses away from the airport, partially to keep them dry.

Khabarovsk Novy Airport’s press services told Russian media agency TASS passengers can expect serious delays.

They said: “It is expected that seven flights will be delayed.”

MORE TO FOLLOW



Paralyzed dog from Jordan stuck in limbo at JFK Airport

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — An animal rescue group on Long Island is trying to help a paralyzed dog from Jordan that’s stuck in limbo at JFK Airport.

Berry is a Border Collie mix, trying to get help in America, but her long journey has reached a complicated snag.

Meredith Festa is with the East Patchogue animal rescue group Paws Unite People.

“Can you imagine you get off a plane, you’re in a crate, people are poking you in a crate, you don’t understand what they’re saying, you’re in pain,” Festa said.

Berry is a Border Collie mix, trying to get help in America, but her long journey has reached a complicated snag. (Credit: Paws Unite People)

She says a similar animal rescue group across the globe in Jordan shipped Berry to the United States, flying into JFK on Monday.

A transporter was then going to drive her to another animal group in Pittsburgh for medical care, but when Berry arrived at JFK customs, Festa says there was a typo on her paperwork.

“The CDC decided because the dog was uncomfortable, they weren’t aware the dog was paralyzed, they thought it might be rabid, so they were going to have to put her on a hold. They told the transporter she was liable. She said, ‘But it’s not my dog.’ So they said, well then you have to leave the dog in the care of the Ark,” Festa told CBS2’s Andrea Grymes.

The Ark is an animal-handling facility at the airport.

Festa says although she does not believe the dog has rabies, the CDC understandably wanted Berry to get a new rabies shot and quarantine for 28 days.

RELATED STORY: Dog Training Expert Offers Tips, Advice For Keeping Pets Busy As People Prepare To Return To Work

Originally, she was worried Berry might be euthanized.

“Nobody at the CDC or customs wants the dog to be euthanized. It just comes to the legalities of the situation, and there’s a lot of red tape and I know the airline is very confused,” Festa said.

Festa says Royal Jordanian Airlines is technically now in charge of the dog. She’s trying to get the CDC to transfer ownership to her group instead.

The Ark says it’s working with several agencies to get this resolved, dealing with numerous regulations around international cargo.

RELATED STORY: After 2 Years Of Waiting, N.J. Boy On Autism Spectrum Finally Gets His Service Dog

“When you add in the complication of a live animal, that adds an additional level of scrutiny that’s required,” said Elizabeth Schuette, managing director at the Ark.

She says Berry is being cared for at the Ark and will hopefully soon reach her final destination.

Festa says the animal group in Jordan contacted her for help because they’ve worked together in the past.

You can get the latest news, sports and weather on our brand new CBS New York app. Download here.

RAF emergency: Fighter typhoons scrambled to intercept plane above London Stansted airport

The flight from Vienna was surrounded by police after landing at the Essex airport around 7.20pm today. Essex Police boarded the plane and removed two men after the discovery in the toilet.

A spokesperson for London Stansted Airport confirmed the plane had landed safely on the ground following the police incident.

Passengers on board took to social media and revealed the plane had been parked up in a “remote area” before being surrounded by police.

Both of the typhoon fighter jets circled the airport several times before the passenger plane had landed at the scene.

The jets are believed to have then headed towards Cheltenham to be refuelled before returning towards base at RAF Coningsby.

Some reports claim the jets were responding to an urgent call-out known as a Quick Reaction Alert or QRA.

Passenger Joanna Czechowska said they had been held for an hour with armed police surrounded them.

On Twitter, she wrote: “Our plane is being held with armed police all round.

“We have been here for an hour now. They told us to put our seat belts back on.

“We are parked in a remote area. Nothing happening yet.

“The police have come on board and taken two men away.

“They found suspicious objects in the toilets and called the police.

“All seems OK now. That was scary!”

A Ryanair spokesman said: “The crew of a Ryanair flight from Vienna to London Stansted this evening (30 Aug) alerted of a potential security threat on board.

“In line with procedures, the captain informed UK authorities and continued to London Stansted, where the aircraft landed normally and taxied to a remote stand where passengers disembarked safely.

“Passengers in London Stansted waiting to depart to Vienna were transferred to a spare aircraft to minimise the delay to their flight. This is now a matter for the local police”.

A spokesman for the airport told Mirror Online that police had been called after an incident on a plane, but did not provide any more details.

More to follow…



Huge flaw in airport coronavirus tests as only 7 percent of cases caught, scientists fear

Speaking to Sky News, Grant Shapps said the UK had no choice but to impose a 14-day quarantine on all arrivals from France from Saturday in order to protect public health domestically from a further spread of coronavirus. “It’s a dynamic situation, and I don’t think that anybody would want us to do anything other than protect public health and public safety,” Mr Shapps said. 

“That does mean where we see countries breach a certain level of cases, then we have no real choice but to act,” he added.

Asked weather testing at the airport upon arrival to the UK could replace quarantine measures, Mr Shapps replied: “Testing on return is something that we’ve always said we’d keep a very close eye behind the science on those things.

“Testing on return isn’t quite as straightforward as it sounds because if you test someone who is asymptomatic, in other words they don’t think they’ve got anything but they may in fact have it on day one on their return, we’d probably only capture a very small percentage, scientists suggest perhaps only 7 percent, of actual cases.

“Now, clearly you need a system there is more accurate than that before you can say to people you’ve now been tested and you don’t need to quarantine.”

READ MORE: Shapps on the spot as Britons rush back to avoid quarantine 

Mr Shapps said it is important that all travellers returning to the UK fill in a passenger locator form.

The Transport Secretary told BBC Breakfast: “The reality is that in all of the things to do with coronavirus, there always has had to be a cut-off and we’ve seen this throughout, haven’t we, in the way that rules have had to be implemented and, so, ‘if we can do this, why can’t we do that?’, that’s always going to be the case.

“What we have to do is provide clear guidance and, in this case, clear law in order to require people to quarantine.

“I just want to stress it is very important that people do quarantine. Everybody returning to the UK, no matter where from, doesn’t matter whether you’re in a travel corridor country or a quarantine country, must at this stage fill in a passenger locator form.

The cost of taking a car through the Channel Tunnel on Eurotunnel Le Shuttle services on Friday is £260.

This is £60 more expensive than journeys taken on Saturday.

P&O Ferries has limited availability, but one person travelling with a car from Calais to Dover can buy a ticket for £200.

Travellers in the south of France face a struggle getting back to the UK before the 4am Saturday quarantine deadline.

Many direct flights to the UK on Friday are sold out.



TSA: 2 residents caught with loaded guns at airport


Two Cumberland County residents were found bringing loaded guns through a security checkpoint at Harrisburg International Airport in separate incidents on Wednesday.

In the first incident, a Mechanicsburg man was stopped with a .38-caliber revolver loaded with five bullets that he had tucked into his laptop case, TSA said.

In the second incident, a Wormleysburg woman was caught with a 9 mm handgun loaded with 12 bullets that she was carrying in her purse, TSA said.

In each case, TSA officers alerted the Susquehanna Area Regional Airport Authority Police, which cited each person on state weapons charges.

The incidents mark the second and third guns caught at the airport this month after a Lancaster County woman was stopped on Aug. 1 with a pink handgun at the checkpoint.

TSA recently announced that its officers are detecting firearms at a higher rate during the pandemic than they did last year, despite fewer passengers at the airport. In July, TSA said its officers detected 15.3 guns per million people last month, compared to 5.1 guns per million people screened during July 2019. TSA estimates it has screened about 75% fewer passengers in July 2020 over the previous year’s volume.

Russia bomb threat: Airport evacuated after chilling email about bombs on THREE planes

Moscow’s Sheremetyevo Airport received a bomb warning suggesting bombs had been installed in three planes.

RIA Novosti news agency reported that more than 30 flights were delayed or cancelled at Moscow’s airports on Wednesday as a result.

An airport in Khabarovsk in east Russia received a bomb threat via email on Wednesday, according to the news outlet.

MORE TO FOLLOW…

 



Russia bomb threat: Airport evacuated after chilling email about bombs on THREE planes

Moscow’s Sheremetyevo Airport received a bomb warning suggesting bombs had been installed in three planes.

RIA Novosti news agency reported that more than 30 flights were delayed or cancelled at Moscow’s airports on Wednesday as a result.

An airport in Khabarovsk in east Russia received a bomb threat via email on Wednesday, according to the news outlet.

MORE TO FOLLOW…

 



'Ready, set, test!': Berlin's long-delayed airport undergoes dress rehearsal for October opening

Never mind, it’s just another delay in the 9-year-old saga of the German capital’s new Berlin Brandenburg Airport (BER), which has long been a national punchline for planning errors and technical problems. This time though, the delay was only for six weeks rather than nine years.

Due to the COVID-19 crisis, the dress rehearsal of operations, scheduled for June, had to be postponed until July 28, and contrary to original plans only about 400 volunteers participated, instead of 20,000 envisioned earlier this year.

“Safety and health take the highest priority,” the CEO of Berlin airport operator FBB, Engelbert Lütke Daldrup, said, noting that the decision had been taken in light of social-distancing rules in place to curb coronavirus infections.

But Daldrup insisted that the revised trial plan still provided plenty of time for the airport to be ready before its planned opening on October 31.

A volunteer tester takes her suticase from a luggage belt during the trial run.

Pandemic rules have limited the number of participants in the BER trial run, but social distancing wasn’t easy to maintain

‘Ready, set, test!’

The official slogan for the trial runs is “Ready, set, test!”, according to the FBB operator’s website advertising for the tests, and anyone “who loves airports or is just curious” can apply to take part as long as they are over the age of 18. Until the official opening in October, a total of 28 test runs are slated. 

On Tuesday, the testing routine for the volunteers started at 9:30 a.m. with individual registration and distribution of face masks to protect them from infections during the day-long exercise. They were also given some food and a personal briefing assigning each of them to their specific tasks.

After they’d received suitcases, the hot testing phase began two hours later with the volunteers slipping into the roles of normal passengers, who were supposed to check in, undergo security checks or line up for boarding.

What was missing though, were real planes on the tarmac that could fly them to destinations like Lake Constance or Mallorca, which were being flashed on the huge flight schedule screens. Instead, there were buses waiting for the “fake passengers,” taking them on a short tour of BER’s sprawling 1,470-hectare (3,632-acre) site.

The trial run ended at around 4 p.m. when the volunteers were asked to fill in feedback questionnaires on how they’d found their way around or if they’d discovered potential areas for improvement.

Aerial photo of The airport site, with the main terminal building sitting between the two runways.

The airport is U-shaped and the main terminal sits between the two runways making it a so-called ‘midfield airport’

‘Long-distance’ airport

The new airport’s main check-in area is located on Level 1 of the six-floor terminal building and houses 118 counters in eight clusters. Volunteer Bernadette Handschug found the distances to walk between the gates “really incredible.”

“All they have is a kind of ‘fun’ moving walkway that takes you no further than 50 meters, which is complete nonsense. I think they should have installed more of those walkways,” she told reporters from local RBB television after her day of testing.

Gudrun Bauer, another volunteer, wholeheartedly agreed: “Halls without an end. Before you reach a moving walkway, you already feel like having walked 3 kilometers. For someone who’s not good at walking, this is a struggle,” she said.

During the day, the volunteers were expected to complete two rounds of testing, each encompassing a full flight cycle from arrival at the airport until the plane’s departure.

Bernandette Handschug later said she had missed her second flight scheduled for Dubrovnik because the gates were too far apart and she’d lost her way due to “bad signage.” 

A group of volunteers walk past rows of suitcases.

Long walks to flights annoyed most volunteer testers, as moving walkways are few and far between at the new airport

FBB chief Daldrup argues the operators had received some “very valuable” hints from the volunteers at what needed to be improved, adding: “The second important outcome was that our staff and those of our partners such as airlines, ground services, federal police and customs officials, were given the possibility to drill their own procedures,” he told reporters.

All’s well that ends well?

Strictly speaking, Tuesday’s rehearsal of operations wasn’t the first at BER. Back in the spring of 2012, thousands of volunteers were already testing the airport’s infrastructure, and airlines were preparing to move their operations from the capital’s other airport, Tegel, also known as TXL.

That year a Lufthansa A380 superjumbo was scheduled to depart to Frankfurt as the first flight from the new airport on June 3. Other airlines had already begun selling tickets to and from BER.

A fire-alarm box displaying that the system is out of order.

An investigation into delays documented more than 10,000 technical flaws, with the fire safety system being the most curcial

However, just 26 days before BER’s official opening, the airport operators were forced to stop the move due to major technical difficulties, primarily concerning issues of fire safety. While a malfunctioning automatic sprinkler system turned out to be the airport’s biggest and most complex problem over the following years, it was also found that the airport’s lights could not be switched off, escalators were too short and rooms were misnumbered.

Since then, there have been only more delays. A number of project leaders have been replaced amid legal battles, and charges of mismanagement and corruption. BER’s building costs have more than tripled over time, from the roughly €2 billion ($2.35 billion) initially budgeted to more than €7 billion to date.

Apart from a toilet that kept flushing and a lack of soap in the restrooms, the volunteers didn’t uncover any major technical flaws in the airport infrastructure, FBB officials said. So, with more than three months to go until official opening, there should be enough time to fix this … shouldn’t there be?