Coronavirus map LIVE: Is this OUR fate? Bleak update from Israel offers DIRE UK prediction

Israel went back into lockdown, its second during the pandemic, this week as the the number of daily new COVID-19 cases reached early 7,000 among a population of 9 million.It comes as Prime Minister Boris Johnson this week introduced tough new coronavirus restrictions to curb the spread of the invisible killer disease.

Britain has the highest COVID-19 death toll in Europe, with a total close to 42,000. New infections have been accelerating in recent weeks, leading scientists to say they could hit 50,000 per day by mid-October if left unchecked.

In Israel, on, fewer businesses are allowed to operate under restrictions, with only “essential” sectors such as finance, energy, health, technology, agriculture and food sales and production running.

Deputy Health Minister Yoav Kisch said on Israel Radio: “We reached a decision to pull the handbrake.”

The current 1,000-metre (0.6-mile)- limit on travel from home, except for activities such as grocery and medicine shopping and commuting to work, will now also apply to attendance at street protests.

Since the outbreak began, 1,316 people have died in Israel and some 200,000 cases of coronavirus have been reported.

The current second wave of infections followed an easing in May of a lockdown imposed in March.

FOLLOW EXPRESS.CO.UK BELOW FOR LIVE UPDATES



Coronavirus second wave: UK cases soar as THOUSANDS infected every day – bleak ONS update

Fears of a second lockdown to fight the invisible killer disease are rising after the Office for National Statistics revealed theere had been around 3,200 new COVID19 infections per day in England. The figures showed that any given time between 30 August and 5 September, around 1 in 1,400 people would test positive for COVID19, an average of 39,700 people, in England.

It comes as Boris Johnson faces an open revolt from some Tory backbenchers over “absolutely grotesque” new lockdown restrictions that limits social gatherings to six people.

One former minister declared: “It is time for us to actually start living like a free people, not subjecting ourselves to constantly shifting legal requirements.”

It comes amid reports that ministers are divided over new social distancing rules in England which will limit social gatherings to groups of six people both indoors and outside from Monday.

The Daily Telegraph reported on Friday that senior Tories also want younger children to be exempt from the so-called “rule of six” in England, while the Daily Mail claimed Health Secretary Matt Hancock was the only Cabinet minister on Boris Johnson’s coronavirus strategy committee to support the plan at a meeting on Tuesday, the day before it was announced by the Prime Minister.

Speaking on Friday, Tory former minister Steve Baker told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “I think it is now time to say that this is not a fit legal environment for the British people.

“It’s time to move to a voluntary system – unless the Government can demonstrate otherwise.

“And it is time for us to actually start living like a free people, not subjecting ourselves to constantly shifting legal requirements, which I think now no-one can fully understand.

“It seems to me the effect of having Covid marshals will be to turn every public space in Britain into the equivalent of going through airport security where we are badgered and directed… I’m not willing to live like this.”

Conservative MP Sir Desmond Swayne said the ban was “absolutely grotesque”.



Nicola Sturgeon fury: How SNP's bleak independence charge could spark political chaos

This warning was made in January as two legal experts outlined the potential for fallout between Westminster and Holyrood. Writing for the UK Constitutional Law Association, the pair said trying to hold a referendum without the UK Government’s cooperation would be a “non-starter”. They also added that Ms Sturgeon’s mandate for indyref2 was “legally irrelevant”. However they said SNP MPs and supporters of independence did have a variety of other tactics available to maintain pressure to find a political solution.

The academics said: “Unpalatable as it may be to some Nationalists that the exercise of Scottish self-determination depends on Westminster’s co-operation, it is hard to avoid the conclusion that this is necessary.”

The article, by Strathclyde University senior public law lecturer Chris McCorkindale and Durham University public law professor Aileen McHarg came as Prime Minister Boris Johnson clashed with the Scottish First Minister over a second vote.

While the First Minister argued she could try and earn international recognition for the need of a second referendum, the experts said this option wasn’t possible.

Instead, they stressed the need for the Scottish and UK Governments agreeing on a referendum process – something that ultimately comes down to politics.

They wrote: “If a second independence referendum is to take place and be effective as a means of achieving independence it is therefore crucial that it be conducted on a proper legal footing – that is, that the rules it sets out providing for the organisation of a poll and regulating the conduct of the referendum campaign are legally valid and hence binding on those to whom they apply.

“Attempting to proceed with a referendum without such a legislative underpinning would be a non-starter, given that it would depend upon the operation of Scotland’s 32 local authorities in organising the vote (none of which is under majority SNP control), and would almost certainly be boycotted by unionists.

READ MORE: Let’s get over it! SNP split erupts as Sturgeon rival lashes out

One thing that could help Nicola Sturgeon and co get indyref2 over the line is the growing support for independence in Scotland.

Sir John Curtice told BBC’s World at One that between 52 to 53 percent of Scottish people now favour independence from the United Kingdom in what will be seen as a major boost for Nicola Sturgeon’s SNP.

The polling expert added the coronavirus pandemic has led to a gain of up to two percent for independence during the last quarter of the year.

He said: “We have had nine independent polls conducted this year and so far in 2020 on average these have put yes at 51 percent and no at 49 percent.

“If you look at figures for the last quarter, the four polls done during the coronavirus pandemic that figure has crept up to 52 or 53 percent.

“So we have been looking at a sustained period of around six months in which on average the polls have been putting yes ahead.”



This is going to hurt! Brexit alarm bells ring as Lagarde makes bleak prediction for EU

Christine Lagarde, its president, said Brussels would have to re-evaluate its business model in order to recovery from the blows caused by the coronavirus pandemic and Britain’s departure from the single market and customs union. The Frenchwoman warned this could hit countries who are heavily reliant on their export markets, such as Germany. The bloc already faces a significant challenge after being left teetering on the brink of the worst recession since the Second World War after governments shut down large chunks of the economy to halt the spread of COVID-19.

Ms Lagarde said the pandemic would have a lasting impact on global trade, which will hurt the EU’s export-dependent countries.

“The whole set of relationship and business models of countries will have to be revisited,” she said.

“Countries cannot be exclusively driven and supported by trade and trade only.”

But in an interview with the Financial Times, the ECB boss signalled a potential overhaul of global supply chains would have a lasting impact on the EU.

“It may well be that this particular crisis will transform our perception of globalisation, proximity, short supply chains and control over one’s destiny,” she said.

And the bloc’s economic woes could be further exasperated if Boris Johnson takes Britain out of the single market and customs union without a trade deal.

Ms Lagarde added: “How one will reinforce the other I don’t know, but they are heading in the same direction, which is not an easy one.”

Today Brussels warned that this week’s Brexit negotiations had broken up without a breakthrough and “significant divergences” between the two sides.

Michel Barnier, the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, had travelled to London to meet his British counterpart as part of the accelerated process.

A European Commission spokesman said: “The EU is engaging constructively and in good faith, as Michel Barnier pointed out earlier this week. 

“We are working hard to overcome the significant divergences that remain between us.”

MUST READ: Brexit chaos: Johnson’s border plans torn apart by cabinet minister

She told the European Parliament: “Progress in negotiations thus far has been slim, to put it diplomatically.

“We have agreed with the UK to accelerate the pace of the talks…I will continue to push for a good solution, but we should also prepare for a possibility of a no-deal scenario.”

The two sides will their first full negotiating round in London on July 20.



Donald Trump hit with bleak forecast over new US coronavirus numbers

He suggested that not enough Americans are adhering to social distancing or wearing face coverings. “Clearly we are not in control right now,” he said.

During the conference, he said about half of all new infections are located in four states.

Earlier, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, said almost half of all US citizens must self-quarantine if they travel to New York.

On Tuesday, the US’ case number went up by over 40,000 in one day for the fourth time in the past five days.

The hike in coronavirus cases is happening especially in southern and western states.

The new surge has caused at least 16 states to halt their lockdown easing or reinstate the lockdown restrictions they previously had in place, according to CNN.

Dr Fauci said Florida, Arizona, Texas and California are the four states currently being affected the most by the pandemic.

In some states, the new restrictions being applied come over a month after they started lifting their lockdowns.

On Tuesday, Governor Cuomo added more people to the list of travellers who must self-quarantine for 14 days if they enter the state. Currently, 16 states are listed.

READ MORE: Trump embarrassment as Republican Party split on face masks

The recently included states are California, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada and Tennessee.

Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas and Utah were on the list before too.

The current decree requires that 48 percent of all Americans self-quarantine upon arrival to New York, according to a USA Today study.

A Senate board heard the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases testify on the reopening of schools and businesses.

DON’T MISS:
Coronavirus: China becomes first to use experimental vaccine [REVEALED]Piers Morgan confronts Donald Trump on ‘white power’ tweet [INSIGHT]Trump humiliation as US president shuts down Russian bounty claims [UPDATES]

He said states were “skipping over” standards that should be met prior to reopening, adding that infections will subsequently surge.

“I can’t make an accurate prediction, but it is going to be very disturbing, I will guarantee you that,” he told Senator Elizabeth Warren.

“Because when you have an outbreak in one part of the country even though in other parts of the country they’re doing well, they are vulnerable.”

“We can’t just focus on those areas that are having the surge. It puts the entire country at risk.”

Robert Redfield, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – who was also present on Tuesday – said that 12 states have seen hospitalisations hike, and Arizona has reported an increasing death toll.



Donald Trump hit with bleak forecast over new US coronavirus numbers

He suggested that not enough Americans are adhering to social distancing or wearing face coverings. “Clearly we are not in control right now,” he said.

During the conference, he said about half of all new infections are located in four states.

Earlier, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, said almost half of all US citizens must self-quarantine if they travel to New York.

On Tuesday, the US’ case number went up by over 40,000 in one day for the fourth time in the past five days.

The hike in coronavirus cases is happening especially in southern and western states.

The new surge has caused at least 16 states to halt their lockdown easing or reinstate the lockdown restrictions they previously had in place, according to CNN.

Dr Fauci said Florida, Arizona, Texas and California are the four states currently being affected the most by the pandemic.

In some states, the new restrictions being applied come over a month after they started lifting their lockdowns.

On Tuesday, Governor Cuomo added more people to the list of travellers who must self-quarantine for 14 days if they enter the state. Currently, 16 states are listed.

READ MORE: Trump embarrassment as Republican Party split on face masks

The recently included states are California, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada and Tennessee.

Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas and Utah were on the list before too.

The current decree requires that 48 percent of all Americans self-quarantine upon arrival to New York, according to a USA Today study.

A Senate board heard the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases testify on the reopening of schools and businesses.

DON’T MISS:
Coronavirus: China becomes first to use experimental vaccine [REVEALED]Piers Morgan confronts Donald Trump on ‘white power’ tweet [INSIGHT]Trump humiliation as US president shuts down Russian bounty claims [UPDATES]

He said states were “skipping over” standards that should be met prior to reopening, adding that infections will subsequently surge.

“I can’t make an accurate prediction, but it is going to be very disturbing, I will guarantee you that,” he told Senator Elizabeth Warren.

“Because when you have an outbreak in one part of the country even though in other parts of the country they’re doing well, they are vulnerable.”

“We can’t just focus on those areas that are having the surge. It puts the entire country at risk.”

Robert Redfield, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – who was also present on Tuesday – said that 12 states have seen hospitalisations hike, and Arizona has reported an increasing death toll.



Coronavirus map LIVE: Alarm bells ring in medical community – bleak discovery in study

A small study, published in the journal Lancet Psychiatry, shows a link between COVID-19 and brain complications. Medical experts say the findings give an important snapshot of potential complications of the virus and highlights the need to investigate the possible effects of COVID-19 in the brain. But the study should still be viewed with caution, as it was a fairly small investigation and was based on doctors’ observations.

As a result, it is not possible to draw conclusions from the data about the prevalence of the complications highlighted in the study.

Benedict Michael, the lead author of the study from the University of Liverpool, said: “There have been growing reports of an association between COVID-19 infection and possible neurological or psychiatric complications, but until now these have typically been limited to studies of 10 patients or fewer.

“Ours is the first nationwide study of neurological complications associated with COVID-19, but it is important to note that it is focused on cases that are severe enough to require hospitalisation.”

The study reviewed 125 patients treated in UK hospitals during the peak of the coronavirus pandemic, in April.

Authors of the research asked specialist doctors to report clinical details of COVID-19 patients, who were experiencing a range of neurological and psychiatric complications that were potentially linked to the disease.

The most common brain complication observed was a stroke, which was reported in 77 patients.

A further 39 patients showed signs of confusion or changes in behaviour reflecting an altered mental state, with seven of these having inflammation of the brain, medically termed encephalitis.

The remaining 23 patients with an altered mental state were diagnosed with psychiatric conditions, including psychosis, a dementia-like syndrome and mood disorders.

The study highlights the need to investigate the links between coronavirus and brain complications and to rule out the possibility that the illnesses were simply co-occurring with COVID-19 rather than caused by it.

FOLLOW EXPRESS.CO.UK FOR LIVE UPDATES.