Emmanuel Macron 'following in de Gaulle's footsteps' with France's hardline Brexit stance

France will not cave in to Boris Johnson’s Brexit demands despite desperately needing a trade deal to prop up its economy, the report said. French President Emmanuel Macron’s Europe adviser said the EU cannot be “weak” in the upcoming tussle over access to Britain’s fishing grounds and regulatory alignment. France’s European affairs minister Clement Beaune insisted Paris would not rubber-stamp a trade agreement unless the UK respects its hardline demands.

Mr Beaune said: “Regarding Brexit, we could accept out of convenience an agreement that is too fast and too weak.

“It is in our interest and the economic interest of many sectors in France, but we can’t be weak.

“We can’t accept access to our market if they don’t respect our rules in terms of competition, environment and health.

“We can’t talk about sovereignty and independence if we don’t pass the test of sovereignty and independence that Brexit represents.”

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Macron ‘following in de Gaulle’s footsteps’ in France’s hardline Brexit stance (Image: GETTY)

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France’s European affairs minister Clement Beaune (Image: LES EUROCITOYENS)

European capitals fear the chances of a no deal Brexit have dramatically increased because very little progress has been made since June.

Mr Beaune’s comments are no surprise, though, as ever since Britain left the EU, the French President has adopted an intransigent attitude towards the UK.

For example, in April 2018, Mr Macron was the only EU leader who refused former Prime Minister Theresa May a much longer Brexit extension.

Unearthed reports suggest he might be following in the steps of his predecessor, former French President Charles de Gaulle.

In a recent column for The Spectator, journalist Jonathan Miller wrote about Mr Macron: “The British have much to offer France in inward investment and defence cooperation, not least in the Sahel. Why this petty connerie, then, from Macron?

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French President Emmanuel Macron (Image: GETTY)

France’s European affairs minister Clement Beaune

Former French President Charles de Gaulle (Image: GETTY)

“Curiously, given that the French export more to the UK than the UK to France, and there has been a vast exchange of population, to mutual benefit, all these deep and constructive relationships seem less important to Macron than protecting the ideological purity of the EU by flagellation of those seeking an exit from this nirvana.

“Or maybe there is more to it.”

When you have eliminated the impossible, the journalist argued, the only explanations that seem to fit the facts are that Mr Macron is a victim of grandiosity, a condition to which inhabitants of the Elysée are especially susceptible.

Or, Mr Miller wrote, that a different scenario has presented itself, and that he is suddenly “terrified”.

He explained: “Here is my theory du jour. It is that Jupiter is existentially frit that Brexit will be a roaring success.

“Perhaps he has read Le Brexit va réussir (Brexit is going to succeed) by the brilliant Marc Roche, London correspondent for Le Monde for 25 years, who believes the perfidious Brexiteers will have the last and loudest laugh, mocking Europe, the bright lights beckoning, a stone raft turned to gold, like Singapore or Hong Kong.

“There is in theory a door C: that Macron has been convinced the British can be forced into a second referendum.

“But this has to be unlikely.

“The Prime Minister of Malta thinks this. Macron is smarter.

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France’s European affairs minister Clement Beaune

Former Conservative MEP Daniel Hannan (Image: GETTY)

“It is not at all clear he really wants us in the EU at all. One of his heroes is de Gaulle.”

General de Gaulle famously kept the UK out by vetoing its entry on two occasions.

The EEC – the precursor to the EU – was formed at the 1957 Treaty of Rome after a thawing in relations between European nations after World War 2.

Two years later, de Gaulle was elected President of France and, although not instrumental in the EEC’s formation, he went on to become a key figure in the history of the organisation.

It was his stance on Britain’s proposed membership, though, that can be seen as resoundingly prophetic to today’s Brexiteers.

Britain initially declined to join the Common Market but, by the late Fifties and early Sixties, living standards in France and Germany began to exceed those in the UK so then Prime Minister Harold Macmillan began negotiations to join.

However, de Gaulle kept the UK out by vetoing its entry in 1963 and then again in 1967.

At a press conference in 1963, de Gaulle cited Britain’s economic and historical “peculiarities”, including its links to the US as well as the Commonwealth – which, he claimed, had the potential to impact upon the future cohesion of the Common Market.

He also famously told the German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer in 1963: “Europe is France and Germany, the rest are just the trimmings.”

At a meeting in 1967, de Gaulle argued Britain’s historical links to the Commonwealth and links with the US meant that British entry into the Community would be destabilising and that Britain would be a divisive force among member states.

Explaining the reason why the French President wanted to keep Britain out, former Conservative MEP Daniel Hannan said: “First, he wanted France to be the dominant force within the EEC and I think that’s hard to argue with.

“But the second and more subtle argument is one he is rarely given credit for.

“He in some ways understood Britain better than its own leaders of that era did.

He made a speech explaining one of his vetoes when he said Britain has always been a maritime country.

“Lengthy supply lines, its trading patterns means it will never comfortably assimilated into a continental block.

“I think that’s true and it never ceased to be true.”

“Britain is a semi European country in a way that I think the other members struggle to understand.”

After de Gaulle’s death, Britain again applied to join the EEC and, with his successor Georges Pompidou serving as French President, Prime Minister Edward Heath took Britain into the bloc in 1973.



Emmanuel Macron 'following in de Gaulle's footsteps' with France's hardline Brexit stance

France will not cave in to Boris Johnson’s Brexit demands despite desperately needing a trade deal to prop up its economy, the report said. French President Emmanuel Macron’s Europe adviser said the EU cannot be “weak” in the upcoming tussle over access to Britain’s fishing grounds and regulatory alignment. France’s European affairs minister Clement Beaune insisted Paris would not rubber-stamp a trade agreement unless the UK respects its hardline demands.

Mr Beaune said: “Regarding Brexit, we could accept out of convenience an agreement that is too fast and too weak.

“It is in our interest and the economic interest of many sectors in France, but we can’t be weak.

“We can’t accept access to our market if they don’t respect our rules in terms of competition, environment and health.

“We can’t talk about sovereignty and independence if we don’t pass the test of sovereignty and independence that Brexit represents.”

ctp_video, emmanuel macron, macron news, macron latest, European Union, eu news, eu latest, brexit, brexit news, brexit latest, brexit deal,

Macron ‘following in de Gaulle’s footsteps’ in France’s hardline Brexit stance (Image: GETTY)

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France’s European affairs minister Clement Beaune (Image: LES EUROCITOYENS)

European capitals fear the chances of a no deal Brexit have dramatically increased because very little progress has been made since June.

Mr Beaune’s comments are no surprise, though, as ever since Britain left the EU, the French President has adopted an intransigent attitude towards the UK.

For example, in April 2018, Mr Macron was the only EU leader who refused former Prime Minister Theresa May a much longer Brexit extension.

Unearthed reports suggest he might be following in the steps of his predecessor, former French President Charles de Gaulle.

In a recent column for The Spectator, journalist Jonathan Miller wrote about Mr Macron: “The British have much to offer France in inward investment and defence cooperation, not least in the Sahel. Why this petty connerie, then, from Macron?

JUST IN: EU power grab: Why Ireland’s post-COVID future lies in EU’s hands

ctp_video, emmanuel macron, macron news, macron latest, European Union, eu news, eu latest, brexit, brexit news, brexit latest, brexit deal,

French President Emmanuel Macron (Image: GETTY)

France’s European affairs minister Clement Beaune

Former French President Charles de Gaulle (Image: GETTY)

“Curiously, given that the French export more to the UK than the UK to France, and there has been a vast exchange of population, to mutual benefit, all these deep and constructive relationships seem less important to Macron than protecting the ideological purity of the EU by flagellation of those seeking an exit from this nirvana.

“Or maybe there is more to it.”

When you have eliminated the impossible, the journalist argued, the only explanations that seem to fit the facts are that Mr Macron is a victim of grandiosity, a condition to which inhabitants of the Elysée are especially susceptible.

Or, Mr Miller wrote, that a different scenario has presented itself, and that he is suddenly “terrified”.

He explained: “Here is my theory du jour. It is that Jupiter is existentially frit that Brexit will be a roaring success.

“Perhaps he has read Le Brexit va réussir (Brexit is going to succeed) by the brilliant Marc Roche, London correspondent for Le Monde for 25 years, who believes the perfidious Brexiteers will have the last and loudest laugh, mocking Europe, the bright lights beckoning, a stone raft turned to gold, like Singapore or Hong Kong.

“There is in theory a door C: that Macron has been convinced the British can be forced into a second referendum.

“But this has to be unlikely.

“The Prime Minister of Malta thinks this. Macron is smarter.

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France’s European affairs minister Clement Beaune

Former Conservative MEP Daniel Hannan (Image: GETTY)

“It is not at all clear he really wants us in the EU at all. One of his heroes is de Gaulle.”

General de Gaulle famously kept the UK out by vetoing its entry on two occasions.

The EEC – the precursor to the EU – was formed at the 1957 Treaty of Rome after a thawing in relations between European nations after World War 2.

Two years later, de Gaulle was elected President of France and, although not instrumental in the EEC’s formation, he went on to become a key figure in the history of the organisation.

It was his stance on Britain’s proposed membership, though, that can be seen as resoundingly prophetic to today’s Brexiteers.

Britain initially declined to join the Common Market but, by the late Fifties and early Sixties, living standards in France and Germany began to exceed those in the UK so then Prime Minister Harold Macmillan began negotiations to join.

However, de Gaulle kept the UK out by vetoing its entry in 1963 and then again in 1967.

At a press conference in 1963, de Gaulle cited Britain’s economic and historical “peculiarities”, including its links to the US as well as the Commonwealth – which, he claimed, had the potential to impact upon the future cohesion of the Common Market.

He also famously told the German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer in 1963: “Europe is France and Germany, the rest are just the trimmings.”

At a meeting in 1967, de Gaulle argued Britain’s historical links to the Commonwealth and links with the US meant that British entry into the Community would be destabilising and that Britain would be a divisive force among member states.

Explaining the reason why the French President wanted to keep Britain out, former Conservative MEP Daniel Hannan said: “First, he wanted France to be the dominant force within the EEC and I think that’s hard to argue with.

“But the second and more subtle argument is one he is rarely given credit for.

“He in some ways understood Britain better than its own leaders of that era did.

He made a speech explaining one of his vetoes when he said Britain has always been a maritime country.

“Lengthy supply lines, its trading patterns means it will never comfortably assimilated into a continental block.

“I think that’s true and it never ceased to be true.”

“Britain is a semi European country in a way that I think the other members struggle to understand.”

After de Gaulle’s death, Britain again applied to join the EEC and, with his successor Georges Pompidou serving as French President, Prime Minister Edward Heath took Britain into the bloc in 1973.



Archaeology shock: Brutal ‘hardline’ reality for researchers in Middle East laid bare

Until achieving independence, many countries in the Middle East were unable to excavate and locate their histories. When emancipation came, along with the return of plundered antiquities from Western nations, the Middle East was able to reclaim its identity. Yet, with independence, sham elections, despot leaders and near-totalitarian regimes, archaeology in the Middle East has been disturbed by political unrest.

This adds to several nations which, in pursuit of cementing their own ideological and religious beliefs, have destroyed the archaeological record of their own countries.

No place is this more prevalent than in Saudi Arabia.

There, with the word of King Salman who doubles up as Prime Minister, much of the nations Ottoman history has been razed to the ground.

This sort of destruction is but one issue archaeologists face when searching for lost treasures in the Middle East.

Archaeology latest: Researchers find obstacles everywhere while excavating in the Middle East

Archaeology latest: Researchers find obstacles everywhere while excavating in the Middle East (Image: GETTY)

Middle East news: Ancient relics lay all around the Middle East given its rich history

Middle East news: Ancient relics lay all around the Middle East given its rich history (Image: GETTY)

As Andrew Petersen, director of research in Islamic Archaeology at University of Wales Trinity Saint David, explained to Express.co.uk, he and his colleagues face several other, often more intense, issues surrounding their work, including the potential threat to life.

Of the problems he has experienced, he said: “At its most basic, you could have no access to the country in the first place, despite knowing there’s stuff to be found there.

“I was meant to be going to Basra in Iraq this year but couldn’t because of COVID-19, yet before that I was unable to go because of rioting.

JUST INArchaeologists stunned by ‘most valuable shipwreck ever’

Mecca: Saudi Arabia has particularly drawn criticism for its destruction of Ottoman history

Mecca: Saudi Arabia has particularly drawn criticism for its destruction of Ottoman history (Image: GETTY)

“I work in Qatar which is fairly easy, but again there are disputes between the gulf nations; but surprisingly, one of the hardest places to work is Turkey – they’ve got a very hardline approach and attitude to foreign researchers, it’s hard to ado anything at all there.”

Dr Petersen explained the very nature of archaeology – that researchers must be outside to work – is an extreme example of the complications involved.

He said: “In areas that may be outside the city but still very populated, you don’t quite know what’s going to happen.”

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Medina news: Medina, an area rich in Ottoman history, has also faced partial historical destruction

Medina news: Medina, an area rich in Ottoman history, has also faced partial historical destruction (Image: GETTY)

Africa: Archaeologists also often find it hard in North Africa where civil unrest is likely

Africa: Archaeologists also often find it hard in North Africa where civil unrest is likely (Image: GETTY)

Despite the tough conditions, Dr Petersen and many others often reap the rewards of excavating in such tense environments.

He revealed how, when digging in a remote area on Qatar’s north coast, he came across an untouched and almost pristine Ottoman settlement.

The moment, he said, was special: “We were working our way to the location and we found some mounds that, really, only looked like an area that hadn’t been cleaned for a while – there were lots of plastic bottles and bits of rubbish.

Archaeology history: Some of the greatest ever finds by researchers

Archaeology history: Some of the greatest ever finds by researchers (Image: Express Newspapers)

“But, the more we dug, the more we found, and eventually uncovered a small town there which was completely forgotten about, it was quite an exciting excavation because we found all sorts of evidence of how people lived, of houses, a palace, a boatyard, mosques.

“What was especially interesting was that even though it’s not that old, the only thing we know about the site comes from archaeology; from our excavations.

Terrorism: A before and after picture of the ruins of history committed by terrorists in Syria

Terrorism: A before and after picture of the ruins of history committed by terrorists in Syria (Image: GETTY)

“If we hadn’t done the work there nobody would have known it existed or what people did there, and we had some quite good finds there – some jewellery, pottery from all over the world, from the far east and lots of different places.

“I got an idea of quite a cosmopolitan society on this deserted coast that people had not known about before, a place perhaps inhabited until the end of the 1700s, we’re not sure when it was founded, but we think from the 1300s to 1700s.”



EU DIVIDED: Macron warned hardline fishing demands increase chance of no deal Brexit

European sources claimed there was a spat between Paris, Hungary and Lithuania at a recent meeting of senior diplomats. At the private gathering in Brussels Michel Barnier, the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, said he believed an agreement could still be struck despite months of deadlock. Despite the Frenchman’s confidence, diplomats described his assessment of the deal as “sobering”.

He insisted Britain would have to agree to a “balanced and sustainable” fisheries agreement, which grants access for EU vessels to its waters, as the price for any free-trade agreement.

But Hungary and Lithuania claimed the hardline demand could harm the chances of an agreement being struck.

France, whose fishing industry is politically charged, insisted it was right for the EU to maintain its tough stance.

Mr Macron’s Brussels envoy said the criticism was “unacceptable”, according to a source.

Future access to Britain’s fishing grounds and the so-called “level-playing field” remain the two main hurdles negotiators need to overcome in order to strike a deal.

During the meeting, Mr Barnier also informed capitals Britain had opted to make less demands for single market access.

He described the possible deal between the EU and UK as “low profile, low quality” because his counterpart David Frost had dropped a number of requests.

Boris Johnson’s chief negotiator with the bloc hopes asking for a less ambitious free-trade agreement will unlock the negotiations.

Mr Frost has told EU counterpart Mr Barnier the UK is willing to accept less favourable terms for manufacturers and professionals as part of the final agreement.

The Taskforce Europe chief believes lowering the complexity of the pact, in areas such as rules of origin and mutual recognition of qualifications, would mean Brussels dropping its complaints about easy access to its single market.

The move comes after Mr Barnier rejected several proposals put forward by British negotiators as “cherry picking”.

MUST READ: Frost drops trade demands in Brexit talks to pave way for skinny deal

No10 also sought to ensure professionals, such as lawyers and architects, would have their qualifications recognised on both sides of the Channel.

Mr Frost also agreed to compromise by signalling the UK could agree to a single overarching agreement with the the EU, rather than separate mini deals.

“EU ambassadors underlined that the EU27 remain ready to move negotiations quickly forward and expressed the need for more realism in London,” a spokesman for the German presidency of the EU said.

“They reiterated their commitment to the joint Political Declaration as the basis for negotiations on all issues, including the level-playing field.

“EU ambassadors also expressed the need for speed in order to make parallel progress on all areas of negotiation.”



Riot fears as police warned ‘hardline’ tactics could trigger summer of carnage

This comes after 22 police officers were injured during clashes at a street party in south London. Two police officers and two members of the public were taken to hospital following the illegal music event which involved an estimated 400 people in Brixton on Wednesday.

 

Following this event the home secretary Priti Patel met with the Metropolitan police commissioner, Cressida Dick, demanding a “full explanation” of the incident.

Priti Patel’s involvement has been reportedly seen as a sign of hardening the government’s response to disorder.

Over the past two weeks during the coronavirus lockdown there have been two illegal raves in greater Manchester and street parties in London which have been broken up by police.

There have also been tens of thousands of people at beaches on the south coast which led Bournemouth council to declare a “major incident” on Thursday.

Police

The government has been warned that hardline policing could lead to more disorder (Image: getty)

Boris Johnson

Mr Johnson told people in England to get out and “enjoy themselves” on 4 July (Image: getty)

Tim Newburn, professor of criminology and social policy at the London School of Economics, told the Guardian that political leaders “talking about crackdowns and firm policing” was “really fantastically unhelpful”.

He continued: “It tells young people that there’s likely to be conflict so be ready for it, but it also restricts the freedom of the police to act.”

Mr Newburn gave his thoughts on the Colston statue incident, in which anti-racism protestors threw the sculpture of a slave trader into a Bristol harbour.

He said: “If you say a particular kind of behaviour will be met with the full force of the law it puts operational commanders in a very difficult position.

READ MORE: Chaos on streets of Glasgow as police swoop in to respond 

Priti Patel

Priti Patel’s involvement has been reportedly seen as a sign of hardening the government’s response (Image: getty)

“What is needed at the moment is clear and firm messaging about the rules around the pandemic, but allowing police to exercise their judgement in difficult circumstances. That’s been lost.”

Police chiefs have reportedly accused the home secretary of “absolutely disgraceful” interference when she berated Andy Marsh, Avon and Somerset’s chief constable, for not stopping demonstrators from pulling down the statute of Edward Colston.

On Friday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said that people heading to the beaches in Bournemouth and across England were “taking too many liberties”.

He commented: “It’s crucial that people understand that on July 4 we get this right.

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Boris Johnson

Boris Johnson said people heading to the beaches across England were “taking too many liberties” (Image: getty)

Police

The approaching summer holidays is a “ticking time bomb” (Image: getty)

“We do this in a balanced way and we recognise the risks.

“And so I say to everybody, you may think that you’re not going to get it and you’re immortal and invincible and so on – and very likely that’s true, particularly if you’re a young person.

“But the bug you carry can kill elderly people particularly.”

Earlier this week, Mr Johnson in an announcement told people in England to get out and “enjoy themselves” on 4 July, announcing that “the bustle is back”.

David Jamieson, police and crime commissioner for the West Midlands, told the Guardian that the approaching summer holidays is a “ticking time bomb”.

He said: “we are not going to be able to arrest our way out of this unrest.

“There is a real sense that there is calamity on its way, especially when the furlough scheme comes to an end, and you’ve got lots of young, low-paid workers whose jobs have disappeared. There will be considerable unrest.”

Priti Patel

Police chiefs have reportedly accused the home secretary of “absolutely disgraceful” interference (Image: getty)

A chief constable told the Guardian that police would not be turned into “paramilitaries” by the government.

They said: “Force is there as a last resort. We are part of the community, not paramilitaries.

“Sustained use of force is a problem. Look at the impact of the miners’ strike. The police became paramilitaries. Once that happens, a lot of trust can go.”