North Korea’s secret tunnels to infiltrate Seoul ‘more powerful than 10 atomic bombs’ 

This week, Kim Jong-un led a meeting at the politburo of the Workers Party, where he warned authorities to prepare for the dangers posed to the country by the coronavirus pandemic and a looming typhoon. Speaking at the conference, Kim, who was smoking a cigarette, said there were “some shortcomings” in the state’s efforts to keep out the “malignant virus,” according to reports. The news came just days after a South Korean diplomat claimed the 36-year-old was in a coma, sparking concerns over a potential power struggle during a calamitous destabilisation in the nuclear-armed nation.

South Korea’s spy agency, the National Intelligence Service, also reported that Kim was planning to gradually transfer authority to his sister Kim Yo-jong “to ease stress,” insisting the move was not linked to his health.

But North Korea has a trick up its sleeve in the event of conflict on the border, which could be a “huge security problem” in the future.

As the Vietnam War drew to a close almost half a century ago, a squad of South Korean soldiers stationed near Korangpo-ri, on the Korean demilitarised zone (DMZ), noticed steam rising from the surface.

Troops across the 160-mile-long DMZ had overheard explosions and subterranean activity for over a year and noticed heavy digging equipment moving around on the North Korean side of the border.

North Korea has a series of tunnels below the state

North Korea has a series of tunnels below the state (Image: GETTY)

Kim's health has been the centre of speculation recently

Kim’s health has been the centre of speculation recently (Image: GETTY)

The United Nations Command dispatched US Navy Commander Robert M. Ballinger and Marine Major Anthony Nastri to inspect the tunnel as protocol required that they remain unarmed and they were escorted by troops led by Korean Marine Major Kim Hah-chul.

Lieutenant Colonel Michael Wikan, who served as an operations officer in Korea, recounted what happened next in the book ‘Espionage and the United States During the 20th Century,’ by Thomas Murray.

He wrote: “Bob lowered himself into the hole first, followed by Tony. 

“Less than a minute later [at 1:20pm], a huge explosion went off that killed Bob instantly. 

“The South Korean soldiers quickly pulled Tony out of the hole.

“We could never determine the exact type of explosive device that was involved, whether a booby trap, mere blasting materials, or a command-detonated mine. 

READ MORE: ‘Hell could break loose’ US plan to ‘secure North Korea nukes’ as Kim dead claims emerge

The tunnels span below the demilitarised zone

The tunnels span below the demilitarised zone (Image: GETTY)

“I have always believed they dug some blasting explosives into a sidewall and electrically detonated it from a distance.”

Later inspections unveiled what came to be known as the ‘First Tunnel of Aggression’ had been lavished with concrete-slab walls, electrical lighting, weapon-storage areas and sleeping accommodations. 

The tunnel was over two miles long, a third of which was on the South Korean side of the border, and had enough space for 2,000 soldiers to traverse it per hour.

There was also a railway with carts installed.

According to a South Korean defence white paper, former North Korean leader Kim Il-sung had ordered the tunnel building campaign in a meeting on September 25, 1971.

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The tunnels were sanctioned under Kim Il-sung

The tunnels were sanctioned under Kim Il-sung (Image: GETTY)

A South Korean soldier guarding one of the tunnels

A South Korean soldier guarding one of the tunnels (Image: GETTY)

He is said to have claimed: “One tunnel can be more powerful and effective than 10 atomic bombs put together and the tunnels are the most ideal means of penetrating the South’s fortified front line.”

Four months after the first tunnel was uncovered, a much larger passageway was found 13 miles north of Cheorwon, at the centre of the demilitarised zone in March 1975. 

This second tunnel penetrated one mile over the DMZ and measured nearly two by two metres in size, with a vaulted ceiling – large enough to accommodate small vehicles and artillery or to disgorge 30,000 troops per hour under the border into South Korea. 

The Third Tunnel of Aggression was discovered in 1978, 27 miles north of Seoul, just a few miles away from the “truce village” of Panmunjom and the American Camp Kitty Hawk.  

South Korean troops had been searching the areas for several years based on the account of a defector named Kim Pu-song. 

The tunnel was finally located on June 10, when North Korean activity caused a jet of water to burst open the covering of an older South Korean borehole. 

The tunnels span for hundreds of metres

The tunnels span for hundreds of metres (Image: GETTY)

This passage, which was 75 metres deep and penetrated 120 metres past the DMZ, was of similar design to the second tunnel and was well-positioned for launching a surprise attack on the South Korean capital.

The fourth and final tunnel was located nearly 150 metres underground, near Haean on the eastern edge of the DMZ.

But, there are likely scores more dotted across the border. 

A Korean defence white paper from 1990 claimed: “It is almost impossible to detect a two-metre-wide tunnel some hundreds of metres under the ground.” 

It is estimated that there are between 16 and 20 more infiltration tunnels that have escaped detection, based on photographic intelligence, defectors’ accounts and overheard demolition activities. 

However, no additional infiltration tunnels have been located since 1990.

South Korean government officials insist long-distance tunnels are unlikely, due to extensive groundwater they would have to traverse. 

The extent of the remaining infiltration tunnels and the role they would actually play in North Korean military strategy remains a mystery. 

South Korea currently possesses far superior conventional-warfare capabilities, so North Korean strategy has shifted away from invasion to a deterrence strategy using ballistic missiles, heavy artillery and nuclear weapons.

‘Espionage and the United States During the 20th Century’ was published by Dorrance Publishing in 2014 and available to buy here.



North Korea’s secret tunnels to infiltrate Seoul ‘more powerful than 10 atomic bombs’ 

This week, Kim Jong-un led a meeting at the politburo of the Workers Party, where he warned authorities to prepare for the dangers posed to the country by the coronavirus pandemic and a looming typhoon. Speaking at the conference, Kim, who was smoking a cigarette, said there were “some shortcomings” in the state’s efforts to keep out the “malignant virus,” according to reports. The news came just days after a South Korean diplomat claimed the 36-year-old was in a coma, sparking concerns over a potential power struggle during a calamitous destabilisation in the nuclear-armed nation.

South Korea’s spy agency, the National Intelligence Service, also reported that Kim was planning to gradually transfer authority to his sister Kim Yo-jong “to ease stress,” insisting the move was not linked to his health.

But North Korea has a trick up its sleeve in the event of conflict on the border, which could be a “huge security problem” in the future.

As the Vietnam War drew to a close almost half a century ago, a squad of South Korean soldiers stationed near Korangpo-ri, on the Korean demilitarised zone (DMZ), noticed steam rising from the surface.

Troops across the 160-mile-long DMZ had overheard explosions and subterranean activity for over a year and noticed heavy digging equipment moving around on the North Korean side of the border.

North Korea has a series of tunnels below the state

North Korea has a series of tunnels below the state (Image: GETTY)

Kim's health has been the centre of speculation recently

Kim’s health has been the centre of speculation recently (Image: GETTY)

The United Nations Command dispatched US Navy Commander Robert M. Ballinger and Marine Major Anthony Nastri to inspect the tunnel as protocol required that they remain unarmed and they were escorted by troops led by Korean Marine Major Kim Hah-chul.

Lieutenant Colonel Michael Wikan, who served as an operations officer in Korea, recounted what happened next in the book ‘Espionage and the United States During the 20th Century,’ by Thomas Murray.

He wrote: “Bob lowered himself into the hole first, followed by Tony. 

“Less than a minute later [at 1:20pm], a huge explosion went off that killed Bob instantly. 

“The South Korean soldiers quickly pulled Tony out of the hole.

“We could never determine the exact type of explosive device that was involved, whether a booby trap, mere blasting materials, or a command-detonated mine. 

READ MORE: ‘Hell could break loose’ US plan to ‘secure North Korea nukes’ as Kim dead claims emerge

The tunnels span below the demilitarised zone

The tunnels span below the demilitarised zone (Image: GETTY)

“I have always believed they dug some blasting explosives into a sidewall and electrically detonated it from a distance.”

Later inspections unveiled what came to be known as the ‘First Tunnel of Aggression’ had been lavished with concrete-slab walls, electrical lighting, weapon-storage areas and sleeping accommodations. 

The tunnel was over two miles long, a third of which was on the South Korean side of the border, and had enough space for 2,000 soldiers to traverse it per hour.

There was also a railway with carts installed.

According to a South Korean defence white paper, former North Korean leader Kim Il-sung had ordered the tunnel building campaign in a meeting on September 25, 1971.

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The tunnels were sanctioned under Kim Il-sung

The tunnels were sanctioned under Kim Il-sung (Image: GETTY)

A South Korean soldier guarding one of the tunnels

A South Korean soldier guarding one of the tunnels (Image: GETTY)

He is said to have claimed: “One tunnel can be more powerful and effective than 10 atomic bombs put together and the tunnels are the most ideal means of penetrating the South’s fortified front line.”

Four months after the first tunnel was uncovered, a much larger passageway was found 13 miles north of Cheorwon, at the centre of the demilitarised zone in March 1975. 

This second tunnel penetrated one mile over the DMZ and measured nearly two by two metres in size, with a vaulted ceiling – large enough to accommodate small vehicles and artillery or to disgorge 30,000 troops per hour under the border into South Korea. 

The Third Tunnel of Aggression was discovered in 1978, 27 miles north of Seoul, just a few miles away from the “truce village” of Panmunjom and the American Camp Kitty Hawk.  

South Korean troops had been searching the areas for several years based on the account of a defector named Kim Pu-song. 

The tunnel was finally located on June 10, when North Korean activity caused a jet of water to burst open the covering of an older South Korean borehole. 

The tunnels span for hundreds of metres

The tunnels span for hundreds of metres (Image: GETTY)

This passage, which was 75 metres deep and penetrated 120 metres past the DMZ, was of similar design to the second tunnel and was well-positioned for launching a surprise attack on the South Korean capital.

The fourth and final tunnel was located nearly 150 metres underground, near Haean on the eastern edge of the DMZ.

But, there are likely scores more dotted across the border. 

A Korean defence white paper from 1990 claimed: “It is almost impossible to detect a two-metre-wide tunnel some hundreds of metres under the ground.” 

It is estimated that there are between 16 and 20 more infiltration tunnels that have escaped detection, based on photographic intelligence, defectors’ accounts and overheard demolition activities. 

However, no additional infiltration tunnels have been located since 1990.

South Korean government officials insist long-distance tunnels are unlikely, due to extensive groundwater they would have to traverse. 

The extent of the remaining infiltration tunnels and the role they would actually play in North Korean military strategy remains a mystery. 

South Korea currently possesses far superior conventional-warfare capabilities, so North Korean strategy has shifted away from invasion to a deterrence strategy using ballistic missiles, heavy artillery and nuclear weapons.

‘Espionage and the United States During the 20th Century’ was published by Dorrance Publishing in 2014 and available to buy here.



Donald Trump’s ‘love letters’ to North Korea’s Kim Jong-un released in bombshell new book

Mr Trump made major efforts to improve US relations with North Korea, attending summits with Kim in Singapore and Hanoi. The Singapore summit, which took place in June 2018, was the first ever meeting between an American President and North Korean leader.

During this time Mr Trump and Kim exchanged a number of what the US president termed “beautiful letters”.

Details about these letters are revealed in an upcoming book by Rob Woodward, a veteran White House reporter who has already published one book about the Trump administration.

Mr Woodward’s work, titled Rage, will be published next month ahead of the US presidential election.

According to the book in total Mr Trump and Kim exchanged 25 letters.

In one of these the North Korean dictator described his relationship with Mr Trump as like something from a “fantasy film”.

Mr Trump caused controversy in 2018 when he claimed he and Kim had “fell in love” during there correspondence.

The president made this remark during an address to supporters in West Virginia.

Referring to the North Korean leader he said: “I was really being tough and so was he.

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According to Kim Yo-jong, sister to the North Korean leader, Mr Trump attempted to reach out again this year as the COVID-19 pandemic struck.

The American president reportedly offered North Korea aid to fight the infection.

Ms Kim claimed Mr Trump had “wished the family of the Chairman and our people well-being”.

She added: “We try to hope for the day when the relations between the two countries would be as good as the ones between the two top leaders.”

Mr Trump’s negotiations with North Korea were aimed at getting the isolated country to abandon its nuclear weapons programme.

In this they were unsuccessful and in June North Korea blew up a liaison office it operated to manage relations with the South.

However North Korea hasn’t conducted a nuclear test since September 2017.

For his book Mr Woodward interviewed Mr Trump around a dozen times in the White House.

The book is believed to focus on both foreign and domestic US affairs.

Americans will go to the polls in November to decide whether to replace Mr Trump as president by Democratic Party candidate Joe Biden.

 



Donald Trump’s ‘love letters’ to North Korea’s Kim Jong-un released in bombshell new book

Mr Trump made major efforts to improve US relations with North Korea, attending summits with Kim in Singapore and Hanoi. The Singapore summit, which took place in June 2018, was the first ever meeting between an American President and North Korean leader.

During this time Mr Trump and Kim exchanged a number of what the US president termed “beautiful letters”.

Details about these letters are revealed in an upcoming book by Rob Woodward, a veteran White House reporter who has already published one book about the Trump administration.

Mr Woodward’s work, titled Rage, will be published next month ahead of the US presidential election.

According to the book in total Mr Trump and Kim exchanged 25 letters.

In one of these the North Korean dictator described his relationship with Mr Trump as like something from a “fantasy film”.

Mr Trump caused controversy in 2018 when he claimed he and Kim had “fell in love” during there correspondence.

The president made this remark during an address to supporters in West Virginia.

Referring to the North Korean leader he said: “I was really being tough and so was he.

READ MORE: Kim Jong-un’s secret office launches desperate plan to raise funds

According to Kim Yo-jong, sister to the North Korean leader, Mr Trump attempted to reach out again this year as the COVID-19 pandemic struck.

The American president reportedly offered North Korea aid to fight the infection.

Ms Kim claimed Mr Trump had “wished the family of the Chairman and our people well-being”.

She added: “We try to hope for the day when the relations between the two countries would be as good as the ones between the two top leaders.”

Mr Trump’s negotiations with North Korea were aimed at getting the isolated country to abandon its nuclear weapons programme.

In this they were unsuccessful and in June North Korea blew up a liaison office it operated to manage relations with the South.

However North Korea hasn’t conducted a nuclear test since September 2017.

For his book Mr Woodward interviewed Mr Trump around a dozen times in the White House.

The book is believed to focus on both foreign and domestic US affairs.

Americans will go to the polls in November to decide whether to replace Mr Trump as president by Democratic Party candidate Joe Biden.

 



Kim Jong-un SHOCK: North Korea’s leader has bizarre rule ‘to protect his faeces’

Mr Kim is believed to take his own personal toilet with him everywhere in his armoured vehicles. He is said not to trust public toilets in case his stools fall into the wrong hands.

Sources close to the ruler’s dynasty have said it would be “unthinkable” for Mr Kim to use a regular public bathroom.

The sources added that his faeces must be overseen as they “contain information about his health status”.

His personal facilities are supervised by his bodyguards, and anyone caught using them could be sentenced to death, it is claimed.

It is believed one of the cars in Mr Kim’s convoy in Singapore – where he met US President Donald Trump for an important meeting in June 2018 – featured a private loo.

He also has his own facilities on his heavily-armoured train, which takes him around North Korea and international destinations such as China, Russia and Hanoi, where he had a show-down with Mr Trump in February 2019.

When Mr Kim travelled to Singapore for the 2018 meeting, one of three aircrafts carrying the North Korean delegation contained an armoured Mercedes and a portable Mercedes “that will deny determined sewer divers insights into the supreme leader’s stools”, South Korea’s Chosun Ilbo newspaper reported.

Earlier this year, different reports claimed Mr Kim was dead or very ill as he had not been seen in weeks, but the North Korean ruler later re-appeared during a tour of a fertiliser plant.

Intelligence agencies have previously attempted to get a hold of stools of different leaders to examine the state of their health.

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Another source said: “He has to travel around the entire country for field guidance, so there always needs to be a personal restroom exclusively for the Suryeong (supreme leader) Kim Jong-un.

“It is unthinkable in a Suryeong-based society for him to have to use a public restroom just because he travels around the country.”

One of the sources claimed the ruler has private loos so his stools can be examined regularly for medical purposes.

Ahead of the leader’s visit to South Korea in April 2018, Lee Yun-keol, who served in North Korea’s guard command before defecting to the South in 2005, told the Washington Post: “The leader’s excretions contain information about his health status so they can’t be left behind.”

It comes as a confidential United Nations report has revealed that various nations believe North Korea has “probably developed miniaturised nuclear devices to fit into the warheads of its ballistic missiles”.

The report was sent to the 15-member UN Security Council North Korea sanctions committee on Monday.

It reads: “The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea is continuing its nuclear program, including the production of highly enriched uranium and construction of an experimental light water reactor.

“A Member State assessed that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea is continuing production of nuclear weapons.”

Mr Kim said last week there would be no more conflict as the country’s nuclear weapons ensure its safety despite continuous outside tension and military intimidation.

The UN document said one country, which was not named, believed that North Korea “may seek to further develop miniaturisation in order to allow incorporation of technological improvements such as penetration aid packages or, potentially, to develop multiple warhead systems.”



Kim Jong-un SHOCK: North Korea’s leader has bizarre rule ‘to protect his faeces’

Mr Kim is believed to take his own personal toilet with him everywhere in his armoured vehicles. He is said not to trust public toilets in case his stools fall into the wrong hands.

Sources close to the ruler’s dynasty have said it would be “unthinkable” for Mr Kim to use a regular public bathroom.

The sources added that his faeces must be overseen as they “contain information about his health status”.

His personal facilities are supervised by his bodyguards, and anyone caught using them could be sentenced to death, it is claimed.

It is believed one of the cars in Mr Kim’s convoy in Singapore – where he met US President Donald Trump for an important meeting in June 2018 – featured a private loo.

He also has his own facilities on his heavily-armoured train, which takes him around North Korea and international destinations such as China, Russia and Hanoi, where he had a show-down with Mr Trump in February 2019.

When Mr Kim travelled to Singapore for the 2018 meeting, one of three aircrafts carrying the North Korean delegation contained an armoured Mercedes and a portable Mercedes “that will deny determined sewer divers insights into the supreme leader’s stools”, South Korea’s Chosun Ilbo newspaper reported.

Earlier this year, different reports claimed Mr Kim was dead or very ill as he had not been seen in weeks, but the North Korean ruler later re-appeared during a tour of a fertiliser plant.

Intelligence agencies have previously attempted to get a hold of stools of different leaders to examine the state of their health.

READ MORE: Royal expert on hidden meaning behind Meghan and Harry’s new addition

Another source said: “He has to travel around the entire country for field guidance, so there always needs to be a personal restroom exclusively for the Suryeong (supreme leader) Kim Jong-un.

“It is unthinkable in a Suryeong-based society for him to have to use a public restroom just because he travels around the country.”

One of the sources claimed the ruler has private loos so his stools can be examined regularly for medical purposes.

Ahead of the leader’s visit to South Korea in April 2018, Lee Yun-keol, who served in North Korea’s guard command before defecting to the South in 2005, told the Washington Post: “The leader’s excretions contain information about his health status so they can’t be left behind.”

It comes as a confidential United Nations report has revealed that various nations believe North Korea has “probably developed miniaturised nuclear devices to fit into the warheads of its ballistic missiles”.

The report was sent to the 15-member UN Security Council North Korea sanctions committee on Monday.

It reads: “The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea is continuing its nuclear program, including the production of highly enriched uranium and construction of an experimental light water reactor.

“A Member State assessed that the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea is continuing production of nuclear weapons.”

Mr Kim said last week there would be no more conflict as the country’s nuclear weapons ensure its safety despite continuous outside tension and military intimidation.

The UN document said one country, which was not named, believed that North Korea “may seek to further develop miniaturisation in order to allow incorporation of technological improvements such as penetration aid packages or, potentially, to develop multiple warhead systems.”



World War 3: Kim Jong Un warns North Korea’s nuclear weapons are ‘absolute strength’

Mr Kim’s claims come on the 67th anniversary of the end of the 1950-53 Korean War, on July 27. To mark the anniversary, the North Korean leader hosted a reception for veterans, the official KCNA news agency reported.

The nation has nuclear weapons armament in order to achieve “absolute strength”, which in turn avoids another armed conflict, Mr Kim said in a speech transcribed by KCNA.

He stressed the defensive nature of the programmes.

He said: “Now we are capable of defending ourselves in the face of any form of high intensity pressure and military threats from imperialist and hostile forces.

“Thanks to our reliable and effective self-defensive nuclear deterrent, there will no longer be war, and our country’s safety and future will be firmly guaranteed forever.”

His claims come as discussions about taking down the nation’s nuclear and missile deterrent in exchange for penalty relief from the US remain halted.

Mr Kim met US President Donald Trump for the first time in 2018 in Singapore.

The meeting suggested that both countries could reach an agreement to end North Korea’s nuclear deterrent.

However, their second convergence, in 2019 in Vietnam, and following work talks collapsed.

Previously, Mr Trump threatened to rain “fire and fury” on North Korea.

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In an interview with Gray Television’s Greta Van Susteren, Mr Trump said: “I understand they want to meet and we would certainly do that.

”I would do it if I thought it was going to be helpful.”

When Ms Van Susteren asked him if he thought such a summit would be advantageous, Mr Trump said: “Probably. I have a very good relationship with him, so it probably would be.”

North Korea has twice this month said it is not interested in more summits with the US.

It reiterated another meeting would only help Mr Trump’s domestic political plans.

Kwon Jong Gun, a North Korean foreign ministry official, in an article in the state-run Korean Central News Agency, said: “Explicitly speaking once again, we have no intention to sit face to face with the US.”

Reinforcing the message, Senior North Korean diplomat Choe Son Hui said: ”We do not feel any need to sit face to face with the US, as it does not consider the DPRK-US dialogue as nothing more than a tool for grappling its political crisis.”

Despite this response from North Korea’s officials, Mr Trump has insisted his relationship with Mr Kim remains strong.

Speaking to Ms Van Susteren, he said: “Just so you understand, [it’s been] almost four years we’re not in a war. Almost anybody else would have been in a war.

“I get along, we talk, and let’s see what happens. But we’ve done a great job and haven’t been given the credit we deserve.”



North Korea’s barbaric indoctrination laid bare as Kim Jong-un dubbed ‘literal god’

Yesterday, North Korea issued a warning to the UK after Downing Street announced its intention to impose sanctions on two organisations linked to prison camps in the country. The regime furiously denounced Boris Johson’s government after learning of the sanctions. Britain’s move essentially freezes the assets of its Ministry of State Security Bureau 7 and the Ministry of People’s Security Correctional Bureau.

No 10 said both organisations are involved in forced labour, torture and murder in North Korean prison camps.

North Korean officials warned that the UK will “pay the price” for its actions.

It added the accusation that it was a “puppet” of the US.

There are thought to be around 15 to 20 “reeducation” camps in the North.

North Korea latest: Citizens are made to believe that the Kim family is descended from gods

North Korea latest: Citizens are made to believe that the Kim family is descended from gods (Image: GETTY)

Prison camps: Sinuiju concentration camp pictured classed as a 'reeducation' centre

Prison camps: Sinuiju concentration camp pictured classed as a ‘reeducation’ centre (Image: GETTY)

Conditions there are life-threatening, with prisoners subject to torture and inhumane treatment.

North Koreans can find themselves locked up if they are accused of political offences or denounced as politically unreliable.

The charges are more often than not arbitrary and are intended to straighten out any dissident crinkles in the country’s social fabric.

From a young age, citizens are entered into an intense indoctrination programme.

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North Korean statues: The country's former leaders are portrayed as god-like figures

North Korean statues: The country’s former leaders are portrayed as god-like figures (Image: GETTY)

Accounts from North Korean escapees claim that in each academic setting, from nursery through until university, people are taught about what Kim Jong-un did at that specific point in his life, as well as other aspects of the Kim family.

In a 2018 Vox report, journalist Yochi Dreazen spoke to several North Korean experts who revealed the extremity of the propaganda programme.

Retired South Korean general, In-Bum Chun, explained that the country’s people have been “indoctrinated since childhood with the belief that Kim and his family are literal gods whose government must be protected at all costs”.

He added: “You’re talking about people who have basically been brainwashed their entire lives.”

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North Korea defector: Kang Chol-hwan escaped North Korea in 1992

North Korea defector: Kang Chol-hwan escaped North Korea in 1992 (Image: GETTY)

North Korea camps: Another camp in one of the countries isolated highland regions

North Korea camps: Another camp in one of the countries isolated highland regions (Image: GETTY)

Kang Chol-hwan is a North Korean defector who was imprisoned in the Yodok concentration camp for 10 years.

He escaped the country in 1992, and later wrote the book “The Aquariums of Pyongyang” in 2001 where he recounted his experiences.

One passage appears to reinforce the idea that North Koreans are led to believe the Kim family are descended directly from gods.

Mr Kang wrote: “To my childish eyes and to those of all my friends, Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il were perfect beings, untarnished by any base human function.

Nuclear war: North Korea holds a sizeable nuclear arsenal

Nuclear war: North Korea holds a sizeable nuclear arsenal (Image: Express Newspapers)

“I was convinced, as we all were, that neither of them urinated or defecated.

“Who could imagine such things as gods?”

Even in his 1992 memoir, “With the Century”, former leader Kim Il-sung revealed the Kim family’s intentions for carving out a god-like appearance of themselves.

He explained: “My grandfather’s opinion was this: If pupils peep into their teacher’s private life frequently, they lose their awe of him; the teacher must give his pupils the firm belief that their teacher neither eats nor urinates; only then can he maintain his authority at school; so a teacher should set up a screen and live behind it.”

North Korea military: The country has millions of soldiers and reservists ready to die for country

North Korea military: The country has millions of soldiers and reservists ready to die for country (Image: GETTY)

North Korea’s most recent threats come amid a string of aggressive military action.

Last month, Kim blew up a joint liaison office with the South after non-governmental activists despoiled 500,000 balloons carrying anti-Kim leaflets.

He did, however, concede that after taking the “prevailing situation” into consideration, the North would suspend its aggression.



‘Utter devastation!’ North Korea’s plan to start war with nuclear weapons unleashed

Last month, the global community kept a watchful eye over the events unfolding in North Korea. The North’s supreme leader, Kim Jong-un, ramped up his acts of aggression and blew up a joint liaison office with the South in the border town of Kaesong. It came after hundreds of thousands of balloons landed in the North from the South.

Each balloon held anti-Kim leaflets thought to have been drawn up by non-governmental activists.

Kim’s sister, Kim Yo-jong, reacted furiously, branding those responsible as “human scum”.

She later called the South “the enemy” before cutting a telecommunications line that had been in daily use between Seoul and Pyongyang.

Many have since called the string of aggression a mere ploy to draw attention to the North and reopen diplomatic negotiations with the US.

North Korea latest: Experts warn that Kim would use nuclear weapons in the early stages of war

North Korea latest: Experts warn that Kim would use nuclear weapons in the early stages of war (Image: GETTY)

World War 3: The North has a vast army willing to die for Kim after years of 'brainwashing'

World War 3: The North has a vast army willing to die for Kim after years of ‘brainwashing’ (Image: GETTY)

This appeared to be confirmed when Kim announced the North would be scaling back its “military action” after having taken the “prevailing situation” into consideration.

Now, the US has announced it is willing to hold talks with the North for the fourth time during Donald Trump’s presidency.

The North’s willingness to oscillate between aggression and reason has, in the view of several experts, placed it in a dangerous region.

In his 2018 Vox report on the North and its capabilities on the war front, journalist Yochi Dreazen revealed the extent to which the country’s unpredictability is its most dangerous aspect.

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South Korea latest: Koreans in the South view the North on a looking platform along the DMZ

South Korea latest: Koreans in the South view the North on a looking platform along the DMZ (Image: GETTY)

“Even more frightening,” he claimed, was the fact that the majority of experts he spoke to about the North said “they believed Kim would use nuclear weapons against South Korea in the initial stages of the fighting — not just as a desperate last resort”.

It is accepted that in the event of any full-blown war, a power would only use nuclear weapons in the face of being completely defeated.

Yet, Mr Dreazen explained that the North’s decision to use nuclear weapons at the beginning of war would, in fact, be a “a rational decision, not a crazy or suicidal one”.

He cites Bruce Bennett, a senior researcher at the RAND Corporation who has spent decades studying North Korea and the Kim family specifically.

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Kim Jong-un latest: The supreme leader is often followed by an entourage of state media

Kim Jong-un latest: The supreme leader is often followed by an entourage of state media (Image: GETTY)

Secret tunnels: The North also has a vast underground tunnel system in the event of a war

Secret tunnels: The North also has a vast underground tunnel system in the event of a war (Image: GETTY)

Here, Mr Bennett used the example of the Cold War and how the Soviet Union approached the nuclear question.

He said: “In the Cold War, we specifically talked about a logic called ‘use them or lose them,’ which referred to the fact that the Soviet Union understood that the first goal of an American preemptive attack would be to knock out their nuclear weapons before they could be fired at the US.

“Now think about how Kim is looking at the world.

“He knows that any US and South Korean strike would be designed to destroy or capture his nuclear weapons.

North Korea arsenal: For its size the North has a huge array of nuclear weapons

North Korea arsenal: For its size the North has a huge array of nuclear weapons (Image: Express Newspapers)

“That means he’d need to either use them early or risk losing them altogether.”

Mr Bennett also drew attention to the “decoupling” strategy employed by the US during the Cold War.

Washington pledged to protect European countries from any Soviet invasion, making it clear they would use small-scale tactical nuclear weapons against advancing soviets to stop the assault.

This changed when the Soviet Union developed long-range nuclear missiles capable of reaching mainland US.

Military power: The North flexes its military might during its 70th anniversary parade

Military power: The North flexes its military might during its 70th anniversary parade (Image: GETTY)

The US was now tasked with the hypothetical choice of Europe or itself.

Mr Bennett says this is much the same in the case of North Korea.

He told Mr Dreazen: “By the time you get to the late Fifties, the French in particular are saying, ‘Wait a minute, if the US uses nuclear weapons against Soviet ground forces in Europe, the Soviets are going to fire nuclear weapons at the US. Is the US prepared to trade New York City for Paris?”

With the North progressing towards long-range missiles, already owning a handful of rockets apparently capable of reaching mainland US, Mr Dreazen explained that this point is “such a game changer” should war ever occur.



WW3 fears: Kim Jong-Un rejects talks with Trump over North Korea’s nuclear programme

North Korean vice foreign minister Choe Son Hui has warned the US Kim Jong-Un has no intention of changing policy and surrendering its nuclear weapons. Kim Jong-Un and Donald Trump have met three times during the US President’s first term.

In their second meeting in 2019, talks broke down after chairman Kim failed to offer enough nuclear weapons or ballistic missiles in exchange for lifting international sanctions.

In a statement carried by the state-run KCNA news agency, Mr Hui questioned the motive of the US and accused Washington of using the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DRPK) for political reasons.

Mr Hui said: “We do not feel any need to sit face to face with the US as it does not consider the DPRK-US dialogue as nothing more than a tool for grappling its political crisis.”

He added: “There will never be any adjustment and change in our policy, conditional on external parameters like internal political schedule of someone.”

The refusal to engage with Washington comes as US Deputy Secretary of State Stephen Biegun, who led previous working-level negotiations with North Korea, is due to visit neighbouring South Korea to discuss relations.

The North Korean vice foreign minister also accused Washington of having a “hostile policy” towards Pyongyang and going back on previous agreements.

Mr Hui added any potential negotiations would be a waste of time and insisted the US is “mistaken” for thinking talks could achieve anything.

He said: “Is it possible to hold dialogue or have any dealings with the US which persists in the hostile policy toward the DPRK in disregard of the agreements already made at the past summit.

“It is clear to us, even without meeting, as to what shallow trick the US will approach us with, as it has neither intention nor will to go back to the drawing board.

“The US is mistaken if it thinks things like negotiations would still work on us.”

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South Korean President Moon Jae-in has said Mr Trump and Kim Jong Un should meet again before the crucial US election in November.

President Moon Jae-in said: “I believe there’s a need for North Korea and the US to try dialogue one more time before the US presidential election.

“The issues of nuclear programs and sanctions will ultimately have to be resolved through North Korea-US talks.”