UK long-range forecast: Britain to be blasted by October heat plume – latest weather maps

Maps from WXCHARTS show a heat plume sweeping over from the Atlantic in a westerly direction as October arrives. A high pressure system will also be pushed towards southern areas of the UK during the beginning of next month, meaning there will be “a fair amount of sunshine” according to Netweather. Temperatures will also be 2C above average during October, forecasters claim.

Netweather’s long-range forecast said: “Into early October there is an increasing chance of high pressure pushing in from the south and bringing mostly settled and warm weather, probably with a fair amount of sunshine for most, and a likelihood of more changeable weather holding on in the north and west of Scotland in particular.

“Temperatures will tend to be close to or just below the long-term seasonal norm early to midweek, with some cool nights midweek as the high pressure moves in and some fog patches in places, but will tend to rise above normal late in the week as there is a significant chance of southerly and south-westerly winds setting in.

“Mean temperatures are thus expected to be a little above normal overall, but only by 1C or less in most parts of the country.

“Rainfall totals are again mostly expected to be below normal, except in western Scotland, where near or slightly above average rainfall is most likely. Sunshine totals are mostly expected to be near normal in central and western Scotland, but above normal elsewhere.”

The latest long-range forecast on the Met Office website between Wednesday, September 30 to October 14 predicted temperatures to rise “above normal”.

It said: “It seems likely that there could be changeable conditions with alternating periods of relatively settled weather, bringing an increased risk of mist and fog in the morning, and more unsettled conditions.

“The best of any settled spells will be in the south and there is a signal that these could become more prolonged during early October.

“Overall, temperatures are expected to be around or slightly above the normal.

READ MORE: UK heatwave alert: Met Office warns of ‘dangerously hot weather’ 

Nick Finnis at Netweather said: “On Wednesday, a cold front will continue to move south from Scotland across Northern Ireland, northern England and on towards the Midlands, Lincolnshire and Norfolk, a band of cloud and some drizzle along the front.

“Sunnier but cooler and fresher conditions following the front across Scotland and Northern Ireland, temperatures following the front reaching 14-17C at best.

“South of the front across southern England and south Wales – a sunny and very warm day, temperatures reaching 23-27C.”

“Weak cold front will clear south from southern England on Thursday morning, so all parts of Britain in a cooler and fresher airmass, with temperatures generally close to the seasonal norm.

“But with high pressure in control, it will be a dry and sunny day for most. Temperatures reaching 17-20C.”

Mr Finnis added this weekend will also see a mixture of sunshine and showers.

He said: “High pressure looks like it will sit close to northern Britain through the weekend, so for many, it will dry and settled throughout the weekend.

“Best of the sunshine on Saturday perhaps, southern areas perhaps turning cloudier from the south on Sunday, with a chance of showers pushing up from France, though some uncertainty over this.”



UK long-range forecast: September to see 10-DAY heatwave as 80F blast strikes – maps

High pressure will send temperatures soaring into the mid-twenties in south eastern areas including London and Surrey from tomorrow, according to the latest hot weather maps from Netweather. The sweltering heat will sweep further north as the week progresses, with York and Hull hit with highs of 23C that will linger until the weekend. Portsmouth and Southampton will experience 26C by Thursday afternoon, as the latest charts turn red.

London will then be blasted with 26C on Saturday.

A swathe of high pressure will sweep over the UK in a westerly direction from the Atlantic, maps from WX CHARTS show.

The maps indicate the intensity of the heat hitting the UK from today, as shades of yellow and orange cover most of the south east, as well as along the north east of England and Scotland.

Terry Scholey at Netweather said: “Eastern and some central parts start the new working week fine, but cloud will slowly increase from the West.

“For much of East Anglia, the South East and the South it’ll stay dry despite more cloud later.

“A South to South West wind will become strong to gale force in the far North and West with top temperatures 14 to 16C in the rain, 18 to 20C elsewhere, with 21 or locally 22C possible in the South.”

The latest forecast on Weather Outlook added Monday will start with downpours of rain, before the heat hits tomorrow.

The forecast said: “Tomorrow temperatures could reach 26C.

READ MORE: UK weather forecast: Subtropical September heatwave to blast Britain

“Central and eastern England have a dry day with variable amounts of cloud.

“A few brighter spells could also develop in central and eastern Scotland this afternoon.

“Temperatures range from 12C (54F) in the north west to 20C (68F) in the south east.”

In its long range weather forecast, the Met Office predicted temperatures to be “slightly above average in the south” during September.

The latest Met Office forecast also predicts “sunny spells” from Tuesday.

It said: “Rain in the northwest, heavy at first, edging southwards.

“Fog patches clearing the south then brighter, though cloud increasing.

“Feeling warmer across parts of the east.

“Tonight, some clear spells over Scotland otherwise cloudy with rain and drizzle for western coasts and hills through the night. A mild night for all.

“On Tuesday, some sunny spells for east Scotland and northeast England otherwise mostly cloudy with light rain for western coasts and hills.

“Heavier rain in the north later. Warm in any brightness.”

“Patchy light rain clearing southwards Wednesday.

“Sunny spells and showers further north. Dry with sunny periods Thursday.

“Cloud and rain in the north Friday, dry and bright in the south.



US on alert as North Korea prepares to unveil new long-range missile at military parade

White House officials said Kim’s latest weapon – a solid-fuel intercontinental-range ballistic missile – would probably go on public display at an October 10 military parade for the 75th anniversary celebration of the Workers’ Party of Korea.

A senior official told National Interest magazine: “That seems to be the most likely of scenarios based on their history — and it’s what we are expecting, but, of course, we are hoping to be proven wrong.

“As we have stated on numerous occasions, we strongly encourage North Korea to return to the path of dialogue and negotiation and refrain from all provocations.

“If they are looking for regime security, that is the only way they can ensure such a goal.”

Defence analysts said until now North Korea has only used liquid-based fuel missiles which take longer to prepare and cannot be left in a ready-to-launch state because of the volatile nature of the chemicals involved.

Solid-fuel missiles can be left in a fuelled state and can be launched much more quickly as a result.

Security sources said this type of missile was was also “harder to detect and destroy in a military conflict”.

The International Atomic Energy Agency said there were no signs North Korea had been reprocessing spent fuel from its main nuclear reactor into plutonium in the past year but warned it appeared to have continued to enrich uranium – another potential fuel for missiles.

READ MORE: Kim Jong-un alive and NOT giving up power to sister warns defector

The UN agency has not had access to North Korea since the secretive communist state expelled its inspectors in 2009 but has continued to monitor its activities from afar, including with satellite imagery.

It is “almost certain” the experimental five-megawatt reactor at the Yongbyon nuclear complex, which is widely believed to have produced plutonium for weapons, has been shut down since early December 2018, the IAEA said in an annual report

It said: “It is almost certain that no reprocessing activity took place and that the plutonium produced in the 5MW(e) reactor during the most recent operational cycle has not been separated.”

By contrast, vehicle movements and the operation of cooling units at a fuel-rod fabrication plant at Yongbyon suggests North Korea has been producing enriched uranium with centrifuges there.

North Korea could also be enriching uranium at a facility just outside Pyongyang known as Kangson that has only attracted attention as a potential enrichment site in recent years.

The IAEA said: “The construction of this complex at Kangson took place before the construction of the reported centrifuge enrichment facility at Yongbyon, with which it shares some characteristics.

“If the Kangson complex is a centrifuge enrichment facility this would be consistent with the Agency’s assessed chronology of the development of North Korea’s reported uranium enrichment programme.”

North Korea has gone several months since its last missile test and nearly three years since testing an ICBM or nuclear weapon.

The unveiling of a new rocket right before the US presidential election in November could be a show of strength to the winning candidate.

READ MORE:
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Masses of North Korean troops and vehicles have been practising for a next month’s major military parade.

Commercial satellite imagery analysed by 38 North, a think-tank that specialises in North Korea, showed formations of troops and vehicles at the Mirim Parade Training Ground, in the suburbs of the capital Pyongyang.

The 38 North report said: “North Korea has been widely expected to hold a major military parade on October 10 this year to mark the 75th anniversary of the Workers’ Party of Korea.

“These images provide the first evidence that rehearsals are underway.”

The Mirim facility is regularly used by troops practising the demanding marching style featured in North Korea’s military parades, which usually take place in Pyongyang’s Kim Il Sung Square in front of dignitaries.



US on alert as North Korea prepares to unveil new long-range missile at military parade

White House officials said Kim’s latest weapon – a solid-fuel intercontinental-range ballistic missile – would probably go on public display at an October 10 military parade for the 75th anniversary celebration of the Workers’ Party of Korea.

A senior official told National Interest magazine: “That seems to be the most likely of scenarios based on their history — and it’s what we are expecting, but, of course, we are hoping to be proven wrong.

“As we have stated on numerous occasions, we strongly encourage North Korea to return to the path of dialogue and negotiation and refrain from all provocations.

“If they are looking for regime security, that is the only way they can ensure such a goal.”

Defence analysts said until now North Korea has only used liquid-based fuel missiles which take longer to prepare and cannot be left in a ready-to-launch state because of the volatile nature of the chemicals involved.

Solid-fuel missiles can be left in a fuelled state and can be launched much more quickly as a result.

Security sources said this type of missile was was also “harder to detect and destroy in a military conflict”.

The International Atomic Energy Agency said there were no signs North Korea had been reprocessing spent fuel from its main nuclear reactor into plutonium in the past year but warned it appeared to have continued to enrich uranium – another potential fuel for missiles.

READ MORE: Kim Jong-un alive and NOT giving up power to sister warns defector

The UN agency has not had access to North Korea since the secretive communist state expelled its inspectors in 2009 but has continued to monitor its activities from afar, including with satellite imagery.

It is “almost certain” the experimental five-megawatt reactor at the Yongbyon nuclear complex, which is widely believed to have produced plutonium for weapons, has been shut down since early December 2018, the IAEA said in an annual report

It said: “It is almost certain that no reprocessing activity took place and that the plutonium produced in the 5MW(e) reactor during the most recent operational cycle has not been separated.”

By contrast, vehicle movements and the operation of cooling units at a fuel-rod fabrication plant at Yongbyon suggests North Korea has been producing enriched uranium with centrifuges there.

North Korea could also be enriching uranium at a facility just outside Pyongyang known as Kangson that has only attracted attention as a potential enrichment site in recent years.

The IAEA said: “The construction of this complex at Kangson took place before the construction of the reported centrifuge enrichment facility at Yongbyon, with which it shares some characteristics.

“If the Kangson complex is a centrifuge enrichment facility this would be consistent with the Agency’s assessed chronology of the development of North Korea’s reported uranium enrichment programme.”

North Korea has gone several months since its last missile test and nearly three years since testing an ICBM or nuclear weapon.

The unveiling of a new rocket right before the US presidential election in November could be a show of strength to the winning candidate.

READ MORE:
North Korea defector gives chilling account of life under Kim Jong-un[INSIGHT]
WW3: US military file unveils ‘North Korea invasion’ plans [ANALYSIS]
US aircraft carry out surveillance trip near North Korea[FOCUS]

Masses of North Korean troops and vehicles have been practising for a next month’s major military parade.

Commercial satellite imagery analysed by 38 North, a think-tank that specialises in North Korea, showed formations of troops and vehicles at the Mirim Parade Training Ground, in the suburbs of the capital Pyongyang.

The 38 North report said: “North Korea has been widely expected to hold a major military parade on October 10 this year to mark the 75th anniversary of the Workers’ Party of Korea.

“These images provide the first evidence that rehearsals are underway.”

The Mirim facility is regularly used by troops practising the demanding marching style featured in North Korea’s military parades, which usually take place in Pyongyang’s Kim Il Sung Square in front of dignitaries.



UK long-range weather forecast: The END of summer? Temperatures PLUNGE as hot weather over

The forecast reads: “The period is likely to start with changeable conditions across much of the UK, with a good deal of cloud, rain and showers in places.

“Generally, temperatures are likely to be rather cool across the country but may be near normal in the south.

“It’s likely that we could see some chilly nights to start off with, but they may gradually turn warmer.

“There is a chance that some rain and stronger winds may develop early next week in the north and west, with the south and east possibly remaining dry.”



UK weather: Charts turn BLUE before red hot heatwave returns – long-range forecast

Despite the hottest August day in 17 years being recorded this month, the weather has taken a turn as rain descended across the entire country. But September is expected to return to hot temperatures.

Chief Meteorologist at the Met Office, Frank Saunders, said: “We’ve seen a real mix of weather this August – with a heatwave earlier this month and in the last week we’ve had two named storms bringing very wet and windy weather across the country.

“With high pressure on the way this weekend we’re going to end the month with much more settled weather, with plenty of late summer sunshine for many.

“It’ll be a dry weekend for most areas too, though eastern areas can expect a few heavy showers on Saturday.

“It’ll feel quite cool despite the sunshine, as northerly winds bring below average temperatures for the time of year with highs of around 16 to 18 Celsius.

UK to be battered with rain before heatwave return

UK to be battered with rain before heatwave return (Image: Getty/Met Office)

Rain to batter UK throughout September

Rain to batter UK throughout September (Image: PA)

“At night it’ll feel really quite chilly, with temperatures dropping to single figures for most, and a chance of air frost in Scottish glens.”

As England, Wales and Northern Ireland enjoy a Bank Holiday weekend, several flood warnings have been issued following the ongoing rain.

Commenting on the weather following Bank Holiday Monday, Deputy Chief Meteorologist Chris Tubbs, said: “Later on Monday low-pressure will once again start to edge it’s way in from the Atlantic and it’ll turn cloudier with outbreaks of rain for Northern Ireland, with cloud and rain spreading to the rest of the UK by Tuesday.

“It’s likely to stay unsettled into the remainder of next week as we begin meteorological Autumn, with spells of wind and strong winds at times.”

READ MORE: Severe thunderstorms to batter Britain TODAY – MAPPED

Weather to start wet before heatwave returns

Weather to start wet before heatwave returns (Image: WX Charts)

A heatwave is expected to return in September

A heatwave is expected to return in September (Image: WX Charts)

The latest weather maps from WXCharts show Scotland, North England and part of Wales turning a pale blue as temperatures hover in the single digits on August 30.

However, the weekend of September 5 to 6 shows the charts turn red as a 25C heatwave descends on Britain.

According to Netweather, from August 31, a dominant Icelandic low will keep the weather unsettled across the north-west of England.

September is expected to see a deep depression come to north-west Scotland, bringing strong winds and rain to Britain.

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September heatwave expected to arrive

September heatwave expected to arrive (Image: WX Charts)

However central, southern and eastern parts of England will miss out of most of the wind and rain.

According to the Met Office the rain will be heaviest across the west with gales in the northwest.

Southern parts will see the best of any drier weather with rain turning more showery in the north at times.

Rain will ease towards next weekend leaving a dry spell of weather for a time across the UK.

September forecast predicts unsettled weather

September forecast predicts unsettled weather (Image: WX Charts)

But the weather will soon turn wet again however in the north and west with stronger winds here, but drier elsewhere.

As the second week of September starts, high pressure in the north will bring longer spells of dry, settled and mainly sunny weather to the country.

The north and west of Scotland are likely to continue to see belts of cloud and rain off the North Atlantic.

Temperatures are expected to be above normal for much of the week but by September 13, it is expected to get colder.

Rain to batter the UK over next few days

Rain to batter the UK over next few days (Image: PA)

As the nights get colder, more unsettled weather is expected to arrive from mid-September.

The southern and eastern parts of England are likely to see high pressures at times, with most of the unsettled weather in the north-west.

The Met Office predicted: “This will mean some wet spells of weather but with dry periods developing between spells of rain.

“The south will see the best of any drier and warmer weather however unsettled conditions in the north may occasionally spread further south bringing spells of wet weather here also.

“Temperatures will be near or at times a little above average with the possibility of turning warm in the south and east.”



UK weather forecast: ‘Tropical air’ to blast Britain as temperatures surge – Long-range

Towards the end of the month, forecasters have predicted a band of tropical weather will arrive from Southern and Central Europe. Southern areas will see the best of the warmer weather due to the arrival of high pressure from Europe. A second band of high pressure will hit the UK in mid-September, after sweeping across the Atlantic.

Low pressure will then track into the north of England, with drier conditions expected in the south.

In the BBC’s long-range weather forecast, they said: “Temperatures will be near normal for northern areas, but we expect some warmer air to reach into southern areas more frequently.

“This is due to high pressure beginning to build back into Southwest and Central Europe.

“As warm fronts move in from low-pressure systems, the southwest breeze will be able to drag some of this tropical air into the UK, but likely only for short periods of time.

“Into mid-September, high pressure is likely to build more strongly in the Atlantic to the southwest of the UK, and this will help shift the winds to a more northwest direction.

“Atlantic air will tend to move into northern areas while tropical air occasionally makes its way into the south.

“Low pressure will continue to track nearby to the north, so most frequently wet for northern areas, but drier for southern areas.”

Prior to this band of tropical weather hitting the country, the UK will see far wetter conditions over the next week.

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“With some ground waterlogged from recent heavy rain, winds could be strong enough to bring down tree branches and perhaps cause some disruption.

“Squally showers, thunderstorms and longer spells of rain will accompany the brisk winds in western areas.

“Eastern parts of England and Scotland should be drier though, with some sunny spells.”

The poor weather has been caused by the arrival of Storm Ellen which swept across Ireland.

Forecasters are expecting wind speeds to reach 75mph (120kmh) on Wednesday night.

Due to its sheer size, weather warnings have been declared for the next three days.



UK hot weather forecast: Long-range chart shows WARM European air return – latest maps

Britain has enjoyed some of the hottest temperatures of the year this week, with the mercury regularly surging beyond 30C in large parts of the country. But the latest weather maps from WXCHARTS show a band of cooler air sweeping in across western and central Europe from Monday, with the UK in danger of receiving the back end of this colder blast. Warmer air will briefly return to blanket much of the continent from Thursday, with the map turning almost entirely blue for almost a week thereafter.

But the weather charts show from Wednesday August 25, scorching air suddenly starts blanketing much of Southern Europe.

This will continue making its way through the continent through much of the following day, before blasting Britain in time for the Bank Holiday weekend on Saturday August 29.

The scorching plume of air from Europe will continue to blanket the UK throughout the weekend, before making its way from the continent towards the end of the month.

The long-range weather forecast from the BBC for August 24 until September 6 warns areas of low pressure could track near the north of the UK and as the month progresses, rain and windy spells are likely throughout most of the country.

Northern Ireland and Scotland are likely to be hit by most of this wet weather, while England and Wales “may only see fleeting spells of wet weather as fronts come and go”, with Southeast England likely to escape many of the downpours.

But the forecast continues: “High pressure may ridge in from Europe to give lengthier periods of dry and warm weather over the southeast, whilst fronts may push into the northwest to give frequent wet spells and fluctuating temperatures.”

But there is “considerable uncertainty to the forecast around the turn of the month”, as one weather type “may dominate over the other for an extended period”.

Low pressure may drift further south than expected, which could bring above-average rainfall to that part of the country instead.

READ MORE: Met Office weather warning UPDATED: Map shows where lightning will hit

There is also a chance of thundery weather, but this is most likely to smash into the east and southeast of the UK.

Temperatures could start “rather warm for many” at the start of this period, but may cool slightly as winds sweep in across the country.

But the Met Office also offers a more encouraging forecast for the two-week period from Bank Holiday weekend (Saturday August 29).

The Met Office says in this long-range forecast: “Although confidence is low for this period, it is likely that conditions will become more changeable with drier and brighter days interspersed with periods of rain and strengthening winds.

“Temperatures should be around the average for this time of year.

“Towards the end of this period, there are some tentative signs that high pressure could begin to dominate, especially across the south of the UK, with a return to more settled conditions.”



UK hot weather forecast: Long-range charts show summer to last until middle of September

As temperatures hit up to 36C this weekend, sun-seekers have flocked to beaches up and down the country to get the most of the beautiful weather despite concerns over the deadly coronavirus pandemic.

But the heatwave could soon come to an end as thunderstorms batter Britain, with the Met Office warning some places could be hit with up to 80mm of rain.

Dan Harris, Met Office deputy chief meteorologist, said: “We’ve issued a broad thunderstorm warning for Monday and Tuesday for all parts of the UK, since although the ingredients are there.

“It’s just too early to pinpoint the details of exactly where and when thunderstorms will occur.

“As such, we will be monitoring the developing signals closely and I urge people to keep a close eye on Met Office warnings and forecasts over the coming days.”

They also warned the storms could affect all parts of the UK at some points from Tuesday to Wednesday next week.

The Met Office has even issued a “danger to life” warning for a number of areas across the UK starting from tomorrow.

Some homes and businesses are likely to be destroyed by incoming flood, lightning and hailstones, forecasters have warned.

They wrote: “Where flooding or lightning strikes occur, there is a chance of delays and some cancellations to public transport.”

READ MORE: Met Office weather warning: FOUR days of lightning to smash Britain

AccuWeather also predicts a slight dip in temperatures between September 11 and September 13 with highs of 19C, before thermometers return to reaching highs of 21C from September 14 to 17 with the forecast, once again, mostly sunny.

During the current heatwave, Public Health England and the Met Office issued a warning to look out for others as temperatures soar.

Ishani Kar-Purkayastha, a consultant at Public Health England, said: “This summer, many of us are spending more time at home due to COVID-19.

“A lot of homes can overheat, so it’s important we continue to check on older people and those with underlying health conditions, particularly if they’re living alone and may be socially isolated.”

News the weather will remain sunny well into September comes just hours after experts warned a second lockdown could be implemented next month.

Sir David King, a former scientific adviser to the government, warned a second national lockdown may have to be imposed next month.

He warned another UK wide shutdown could be needed in September unless the Government sorts out its ‘Test and Trace’ policy this month.

He said the reopening of schools is likely to boost the R rate, the number of people each COVID-19 patient infects, by 0.5.



Hot weather forecast: Long-range charts show week-long 30C heatwave strike – new maps

Temperatures across much of the UK are forecast to rise from next Sunday, July 26, according to new weather charts. The heatwave is set to rise well into August, as the mercury soars into the low 30s in just a week. The south of England can expect the best of the sizzling sunshine, but the West Country, Midlands and Wales can expect temperatures to rise to the low 20s.

Netweather forecasts expect temperatures to soar from Sunday, July 26, as the mercury rises to 26C.

The sunny weather is set to last for around a week, with temperatures staying in the mid 20s for much of England.

Friday, July 31 will be a little cooler, as the last day of the month sees temperatures dip to 23C.

But by next weekend the mercury is forecast to soar once again to as high as 30C, as new weather charts show the south of England turn blood red as the heatwave strikes.

Saturday is expected to see temperatures rise into the high 20s in the south of England and parts of Wales.

But Sunday, August 2 will see the best of the glorious sunshine, as temperatures rise to as high as 30C.

The heatwave is also set to move further north, as the Midlands and parts of northern England also see the mercury soar.

WXCharts also show a marked change in temperatures from the first weekend in August, as an area of high pressure sweeps across the UK.

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“In between the rain belts, there will be some brighter, showery weather, with the majority of the showers in the north and east of Britain, where they could be thundery in places, most likely the eastern side of England.”

As we enter the first week of August, the sunny spell in the south is expected to continue due to an area of high pressure moving in.

Netweather said: “A dry sunny spell is expected in the south early this week with high pressure ridging into the south for a time, but confidence is lower regarding whether the dry sunny weather will extend into Scotland and Northern Ireland, where it is more likely to remain cloudier with low pressure close to the north-west of Britain.

“Temperatures will generally not be far from normal but there is potential for it to turn quite hot for a time around midweek, particularly in the southeast.”

They added: “Mean temperatures will mostly be around the normal for the time of year, but probably about 1C above in the east of England.

“Rainfall and sunshine totals are most likely to be near normal for most, but again in the south and especially southeast it may remain drier than normal.”