Alesha Dixon style: Britain’s Got Talent judge wears Black Lives Matter necklace for show

Opting for her hair up, the judge had her sleek brown hair in a long ponytail which fell under her shoulders.

Alesha wore a lot of gold jewellery with two rings on each hand as well as multiple earrings in each ear.

She went for a soft glam makeup look with contour and a peach blush and she completed the look with a brown lip.

The singer posted a sneak peek of her look on her Instagram before the show.



A White police chief lays out why BLM protests matter in small towns

Doug Swartz, Canal Fulton’s police chief of eight years, writes a column for a community newsletter quarterly tackling a variety of topics. This month, he focused on the Black Lives Matter movement after seeing several people on his social media feeds asking why it was necessary to demonstrate, especially in the small town of Canal Fulton with a population just under 5,500. Canal Fulton is about 50 miles south of Cleveland.

Thousands have demonstrated in communities across the world to protest and demand racial justice in the aftermath of George Floyd’s death. The 46-year-old Black man died May 25 at the hands of Minneapolis police with his last moments caught on video. About 93% of racial justice protests in the US since Floyd’s death have been peaceful and nondestructive, according to a new report.

“If we truly seek fulfillment in our lives, the White community also needs the Black community just as much, if not more,” Swartz wrote. “Our continuously intersecting lives will always be contentious if we don’t stop and take time to actively listen to one another and understand.”

Bridging the gap between races

A few residents tried to organize protests in Canal Fulton, according to Swartz, but due to lack of manpower and the coronavirus pandemic, the demonstrations never materialized.

After her grandson made a Facebook post about why Black lives matter, Roslyn Haines, a Black minister in town, told CNN she was inspired and wanted to do something. Haines and a few other residents came together to form the group “Bridging The Gap.”

“It’s to bridge the gap of all races, all groups so that there is total peace and no misunderstandings,” she said. “Along with the violence, the racism, has to stop.”

Black Lives Matter protests aren't just happening in big cities. They're also in America's small towns

Haines grew up in Akron but relocated to Canal Fulton a few years ago and said she’s never experienced racism directly, but like anywhere, she said she knows it’s out there.

“It’s a good community to live in and I’m glad that I live out here, I just want to see people come together,” she said. “And if it spreads here in Canal Fulton, it can spread across the United States.”

Even though “Bridging The Gap” had to push pause on their efforts, Haines said the group is in the planning stages for another rally next year.

“If a small city like Canal Fulton can come together as one, then other cities will see that and from there it would be like a domino effect,” she said. “Sometimes we have to start small in order to get really big.”

Fixing the ‘atrocities that occurred just a few short decades ago’

To understand why peaceful protests are important, particularly in small towns, Swartz said it’s vital to understand the role American history played.

Though the United States declared its independence on July 4, 1776, Swartz wrote he personally feels the country wasn’t a “free nation” until the 13th Amendment in 1865, which abolished slavery. But even then, he said, “was the African American race truly a free race after that day? Free of racism and discrimination?”

Because Canal Fulton is predominantly White, Swartz said the community is blind to the struggles of their Black neighbors.

“How do you know about it, if you don’t know about it,” he said. “If there are struggles that are going on in predominately Black neighborhoods, we don’t know about it, our kids go to schools that are predominately White. And we’re a byproduct of that history with the things that are wrong in today’s society, that’s why we have to listen to people and hear from them to see how we can make things better.”

Kenosha police chief says deadly shooting wouldn't have happened if people weren't out after curfew

Swartz said ultimately, it’s the responsibility of all communities, big or small, to “move resources to help fix today the aftermath of the atrocities that occurred just a few short decades ago.”

“In summary, African Americans had little family, religion, education, or wealth to go with their newly found freedoms nor to rectify the generations of wrongs they received,” Swartz wrote. “They were in no position to stop what was coming next, which was a century long of practices of discrimination, racism, segregation, and manipulating African Americans of being inferior to the White supremacy.”

“Everyone on this earth older than 56 years of age, lived in a time when African Americans were barred from using bathrooms that were labeled, ‘Whites Only.’ What message do you think that sent our parents and grandparents? That message was that of Blacks being less of a person than that a White person.”

Able to grow by listening to the struggles of marginalized communities

“I’m starting to understand this message is bigger than I intended it to be,” Swartz said. “I’m struggling though to understand why it is getting so much attention when you can find all this information on the internet, but I guess it’s coming from the position of a small town police chief in America.”

The positive emails and feedback have continued to pour in since the article published, he said.

Swartz admits in his younger years he may have said or thought differently, but because he dove deeper into history and listened to the struggles of marginalized communities, he was able to grow and write this commentary piece.

“To do this, African Americans are going to need the vast majority of support (votes) to help enact legislation which will help move critical resources and funding into areas such as our education and housing systems,” he wrote. “That means you and me here in Canal Fulton. That means protesting in little towns to help bring awareness to these issues that are still in the shadows of the discriminatory practices occurring in the 60s. That means our citizens helping to understand what African Americans in other communities are currently struggling with as it will be our vote and support that helps.”

The three reasons Black Lives Matter marchers refuse to quit

“It begins by active listening and the understanding of our long-term goals, even well past our own lives, as well as history’s misdeeds,” he wrote. “Recognizing the rights of everyone including the right to peacefully protest, wherever and whenever, is a key element of fostering change for any good cause.”

Swartz said even though past protests didn’t materialize, he would gladly welcome any future peaceful demonstrations within the community and support residents in their efforts.

“No matter what the cause is, we have to be able to say ‘that’s great, that’s the American way,’ that’s what you’re allowed to do and anyone who is trying to stop someone from practicing their constitutional rights needs to stop and think about what they’re actually doing,” he said.

BREXIT FURY: EU chief VDL tells MEPs deal ON BRINK over Boris' bill 'A matter of LAW'

The European Commission President insisted there is “very little time” to broker a future relationship agreement after a fiery row over the Government’s Internal Market Bill. In her first State of the Union address at the European Parliament, the top eurocrat accused Downing Street of not showing “good faith” with its plans to revoke EU customs checks and state aid rules for Northern Ireland as part of the divorce deal signed less than a year ago. She said: “This Withdrawal Agreement took three years to negotiate, and we worked relentlessly on it, line by line, word by word, together we’ve succeeded.

“And the result guarantees our citizens’ rights, financial interests, the integrity of the single market and crucially the Good Friday Agreement. The European Union and the UK jointly agreed it was the best, and only way, for ensuring peace on the island of Ireland.

“We will never backtrack on that. And this agreement has been ratified by this house and by the House of Commons. It cannot be unilaterally changed, disregarded or disapplied. This is a matter of law, trust and good faith.”

MORE TO FOLLOW…



Meghan Markle ‘planning Black Lives Matter’ movie as part of mega Netflix deal

Last week the streaming giant announced a major new deal with the Duke and Duchess of Sussex. The couple have agreed to produce films, documentaries and children’s shows for the company.

Whilst the exact figure hasn’t been released Meghan and Harry’s Netflix deal has been estimated to be worth $150million (£120million).

According to the Daily Mirror Meghan is keen to produce a film about Patrisse Cullors, one of the co-founders of Black Lives Matter.

The prominent activist has reportedly “hugely inspired” the Duchess.

She launched Black Lives Matter back in 2013 along with Opal Tometi and Alicia Garza.

A source explained: “Meghan has been blown away by the incredible work Patrisse has done. She thinks her story needs to be told – and she would love to be the one to make it.”

Ms Cullors has previously said she would refuse to meet with President Trump who she has reportedly described as the “epitome of evil”.

The Black Lives Matter movement saw a surge in support following the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, whilst he was being taken into custody by police in Minneapolis.

In response huge protests broke out across the United States, and even outside it, demanding social and racial justice.

READ MORE: Britons furious at Meghan Markle keeping royal title

He said: “Harry and Meghan have inspired millions of people all around the world with their authenticity, optimism and leadership.

“We’re incredibly proud they have chosen Netflix as their creative home – and are excited about telling stories with them that can help build resilience and increase understanding for audiences everywhere.”

Back in January the Duke and Duchess caused a global sensation by announcing they planned to step down as senior members of the royal family.

Instead the couple pledged to become financially independent and said they would divide their time between North America and Britain.

After a brief stay in Canada they moved to California, Meghan’s home state, shortly before the coronavirus lockdown began.

Recently they purchased a new £11.2million property to the north of Los Angeles.

The luxury property comes complete with a swimming pool, tennis court and children’s cottage.

Reacting to the Netflix deal the Duke and Duchess said: “Our lives, both independent of each other and as a couple, have allowed us to understand the power of the human spirit, of courage, resilience and the need for connection.

“Through our work with diverse communities and their environments, to shining a light on people and causes around the world, our focus will be on creating content that informs but also gives hope.

“As new parents, making inspirational family programming is also important to us, as is powerful storytelling through a truthful and relatable lens.”



BBC blow as two thirds say SCRAP licence fee in poll ‘only a matter of time’

Exclusive research by OnePoll for the Sunday Express reveals that only around one in five people still support the £157.50 fee that must be paid by any household with a colour television.

There is overwhelming backing for a major overhaul of the broadcaster.

When asked if the BBC should reform or change its ways significantly, nearly two-thirds (62.49 percent) said it should with only 18.93 percent disagreeing.

These findings come in the wake of widespread anger at the axing of free TV licences for all but the poorest over-75s. There was further embarrassment for the embattled broadcaster when public outcry at a decision not to have singers perform Rule, Britannia! and Land of Hope and Glory at The Last Night of the Proms forced a u-turn.

The BBC has also come under intense criticism for announcing the axing of 450 jobs across regional TV news and current affairs in England. These and other controversies have flared up just as it faces unprecedented competition from online streaming services such as Netflix and Amazon.

Against this backdrop, 66.33 percent of respondents backed the scrapping of the mandatory licence fee, with only 20.93 percent wanting it kept.

Conservative MP Philip Davies, one of Parliament’s highest profile critics of the BBC, said: “It’s pretty clear that the BBC itself and the licence fee have completely lost the confidence of the British people. It’s not only a matter of time before [the fee] is scrapped and the BBC has to go to a subscription model.

“It would, I think, be in their best interests – before they lose even more support amongst the British people – if they embrace that and go down that route voluntarily rather than going down kicking and screaming, which is the only other possible outcome.”

The polling shows significant support for alternative models of funding the BBC.

The most popular option, backed by 38.81 percent, is that it should take advertising. More than a third (35.81 percent) say the BBC should accept sponsorship, while 27.02 percent support the present licence fee with “tweaks and cost savings”.

More than a quarter (25.82 percent) would support Government funding for elements such as the news and the World Service and 25.52 percent back a voluntary subscription model.

Only 15.53 percent support a pay-per-view model which would see people pay to see individual shows such as Blue Planet and Strictly Come Dancing.

The public are split on how well the broadcaster reflects British values.

When respondents were asked how well they thought the BBC and its pundits reflect the values of the majority of the British people, 42.31 percent said “very well” or “quite well”, with 40.91 percent saying “very poorly” or “quite poorly”.

Shipley MP Mr Davies hopes the BBC will reverse the axing of free licences for most over-75s, accusing it of making savings “on the back of old age pensioners in order to protect Gary Lineker’s salary”.

He said: “They basically treat the people who fund them with utter contempt and so they shouldn’t wonder when the upshot of it is opinion polls like this..

“When I was a kid growing up, if you wanted to watch the best sport, the best comedy, the best drama, you watched the BBC. Now, if you want to watch the best sport you watch Sky, if you want to watch the best drama you watch Netflix, and if you want to watch the best comedy you try and find some channel showing comedy shows from about 30 years ago…

“The last place you go is to the BBC for any of that stuff and yet people are having to pay more and more for the licence fee in effect for worse and worse programming.”

A BBC spokeswoman said: “Our analysis of public opinion shows that the licence fee is the most popular way to fund the BBC. Long-term polling shows 41% of the public pick the licence fee as the best way to fund the BBC, above advertising (30%) and subscription (26%).

“The licence fee ensures the BBC is an independent, universal broadcaster, committed to serving everyone – not the interests of advertisers or shareholders – and to investing in British creativity.”



Prince Harry gives emotional update on Netflix project – ‘No matter how hard my life is’

The Duke of Sussex participated in the video call with athletes who feature in the documentary including Tatyana McFadden and Matt Stutzman, Bebe Vio, Jean-Baptiste Alaize and Ntando Mahlangu. He said the new Netflix production aims to end “stereotyping and preconceptions” in Paralympic sports.

During the meeting, the Duke said: “With COVID and everything else that is happening at the moment, your stories and the strength that you guys show, is incredible and that needs to be seen more.

“It needs to be spoken about more, to try and get rid of the stereotyping to get rid of those preconceptions.”

He added: “My biggest hope is that people will watch this film and go ‘No matter how hard my life is, no matter how hard a day or a week can be, this what I aspire to, not just for me but for my family and all the loved ones around me.’

“It is that element that I think will end up changing the world, so well done and thank you very much.”

Describing the importance of sport in people’s lives in a trailer for the documentary, Harry said: “There isn’t anything else in the world that can bring you back from the darkest places than sport.

“Yes, lives are being changed on the track.

“But lives are also being changed in the stands.”

A description for the documentary claims it “tells the extraordinary story of the Paralympic Games.”

It adds: “From the rubble of World War II to the third biggest sporting event on the planet, the Paralympics sparked a global movement which continues to change the way the world thinks about disability, diversity & human potential”.

READ MORE: World War 3: China will keep ‘us at arm’s length’ as conflict looms

“We merely created a platform in order for them to shine and it’s genuinely been one of the greatest honours of my life to get to know all you guys and to see you through this process.

“We’ve had some laughs, we’ve had some tears, and I can’t ever thank you enough for the impact that you have had across the world, to be able to create better understanding for those people who put the uniform on.”

The Zoom call comes as news emerged that Harry and his wife, Meghan Markle, have signed a deal with Netflix to create documentaries, feature films and other shows.

The Duke and the Duchess will focus “on creating content that informs but also gives hope”.

Releasing a statement, they said: “Our lives, both independent of each other and as a couple, have allowed us to understand the power of the human spirit: of courage, resilience, and the need for connection.



Black Lives Matter protesters topple and BEHEAD statue of Canada’s first Prime Minister

Video footage shows protestors using ropes to pull the statue, which had been in place for 120 years. Demonstrators, who claimed to be supporting the ‘Black Lives Matter’ movement, claimed the statue was a celebration of colonialism and racism.

As the statue fell from its plinth the head, which was bashed against the stone base, was knocked off.

Protestors later took photographs of themselves posing with the decapitated head.

As the statue started falling there was loud cheering and celebratory whooping from the crowd.

Montreal Mayor Valérie Plante condemned “the acts of vandalism that took place this afternoon in downtown Montreal”.

She added monuments are currently at “the heart of emotional debates” about Canada’s identity and colonial past.

Police are currently investigating the incident.

When contacted by CBC Montreal a march organiser declined to comment on the attack.

Ms Plante added: “I understand and share the motivation of citizens who want to live in a more just and inclusive society.

READ MORE: Black Lives Matter shooting – Gun vigilante suspect went to Trump rally

He died in office during his second term in 1891.

Sir John became Prime Minister after the 1867 British North America Act devolved substantial powers from London to Canada, then a British colony.

A number of statues around the world have been toppled by groups claiming to support the Black Lives Matter movement after George Floyd was killed whilst being arrested by police in May.

In Bristol, UK, a statue of merchant and slave trader Edward Colston was torn down in June and dumped in the city’s harbour.

It was later recovered and put in safe storage by Bristol City Council.

In the United States a number of monuments to former Confederate generals and soldiers have been pulled down during protests.

More mainstream figures have also been targeted including statues of George Washington in Portland and abolitionist Frederick Douglass in Rochester, New York.

Earlier this week two men were shot dead by an armed vigilante in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

It followed protests and riots over the police shooting of a black man which left him seriously injured in hospital.

Police arrested a 17-year-old male, Kyle Rittenhouse, on suspicion of murder.



Black Lives Matter protesters topple and BEHEAD statue of Canada’s first Prime Minister

Video footage shows protestors using ropes to pull the statue, which had been in place for 120 years. Demonstrators, who claimed to be supporting the ‘Black Lives Matter’ movement, claimed the statue was a celebration of colonialism and racism.

As the statue fell from its plinth the head, which was bashed against the stone base, was knocked off.

Protestors later took photographs of themselves posing with the decapitated head.

As the statue started falling there was loud cheering and celebratory whooping from the crowd.

Montreal Mayor Valérie Plante condemned “the acts of vandalism that took place this afternoon in downtown Montreal”.

She added monuments are currently at “the heart of emotional debates” about Canada’s identity and colonial past.

Police are currently investigating the incident.

When contacted by CBC Montreal a march organiser declined to comment on the attack.

Ms Plante added: “I understand and share the motivation of citizens who want to live in a more just and inclusive society.

READ MORE: Black Lives Matter shooting – Gun vigilante suspect went to Trump rally

He died in office during his second term in 1891.

Sir John became Prime Minister after the 1867 British North America Act devolved substantial powers from London to Canada, then a British colony.

A number of statues around the world have been toppled by groups claiming to support the Black Lives Matter movement after George Floyd was killed whilst being arrested by police in May.

In Bristol, UK, a statue of merchant and slave trader Edward Colston was torn down in June and dumped in the city’s harbour.

It was later recovered and put in safe storage by Bristol City Council.

In the United States a number of monuments to former Confederate generals and soldiers have been pulled down during protests.

More mainstream figures have also been targeted including statues of George Washington in Portland and abolitionist Frederick Douglass in Rochester, New York.

Earlier this week two men were shot dead by an armed vigilante in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

It followed protests and riots over the police shooting of a black man which left him seriously injured in hospital.

Police arrested a 17-year-old male, Kyle Rittenhouse, on suspicion of murder.



How to copy Meghan Markle's style – no matter what your size, shape or budget

Dressing like a Duchess has become a way to boost your style credentials ever since Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton joined the Royal Family. The new royals have influenced many a fashion trend with their wardrobe choices and frequently cause clothes, bags and shoes to sell out as fans flurry to get the look. But while Kate’s dress sense is fairly elegant and formal, Meghan has wowed fashion followers with her more laid-back looks, especially since moving back to LA – so how can you dress like the modern royal? 

When it comes to her wardrobe, Meghan has mastered her look, according to Rich Simmons, Lead Stylist at Stitch Fix UK. 

“Meghan’s signature style is sophisticated and elegant – she’s often seen wearing smart basics and tailored separates, be it shirt dresses, pencil skirts, pointed court shoes or trouser suits,” the fashion expert mused. 

“She’s great at a smart casual look, but when the occasion requires it, she tends to favour a smart, fitted, stylish aesthetic. 

“She’s definitely mastered the crisp white shirt, which she dons at both casual events and more important engagements, teaming perfectly with jeans, a blazer and pumps or a gorgeous tailored two-piece.”

However, while she clearly has an eye for fashion, Meghan also has expensive taste. 

“In Meghan’s case, her elegance often comes with a hefty price tag; her pumps are often Manolo’s and her coats Victoria Beckham,” said Rich. 

“Then there’s her favourite fashion house of all, Givenchy – Claire Waight Keller designed her wedding dress, dressed her for her first royal tour and first solo engagement. 

“Whilst Keller has now left the label, she was certainly her go-to designer of choice for many of her appearances and engagements as a member of the Royal Family.”

READ MORE: Hidden meaning behind Meghan Markle’s wedding dress

Rich also believes that Meghan’s style has evolved since marrying into the monarchy – and again since she stepped down from her royal duties with husband Prince Harry. 

“Before joining the royal family, she was a much more casual dresser – her classic tailored look and stylish workwear approach definitely began once she began her royal engagements,” explained Rich. 

“This continued into her maternity wardrobe – it blossomed with a rainbow of smartly tailored dresses and coats, with elements like double-breasted buttons, cinched waists, and the occasional A-line shape.”

The fashion pro noticed that Meghan even kept to her high-fashion taste during her pregnancy, wearing custom outfits from Valentino in the month before Archie was born. 

However, the summer after Meghan became a mum for the first time, she began switching back to her pre-royal style. 

“Since she’s stepped down from royal duties, whilst she’s still a fan of classic elegance, and the crisp white shirt still makes its appearance, it’s been great to see she’s incorporated even more casual looks into her wardrobe,” said Rich, suggesting it may be a “symbol of her newfound freedom and a more relaxed way of life”. 

DON’T MISS: 
Meghan Markle’s birthday cake was English classic by her fave bakery [COMMENT]Meghan Markle and Prince Harry net worth: How royals funded new home [INSIGHT]Kate Middleton’s face mask sparks ditsy print trend – where to buy [PICTURES]

But while Meghan has a distinctive style, she has plenty in common with her sister-in-law Kate Middleton too. 

“Similar to Kate, she’s also a fan of recycling garments, modernising worn-before looks with fresh accessories,” commented Rich. 

“For example, she wore a purple Aritzia dress whilst pregnant, which she wore again in October that year. 

“Another example is the beige sleeveless trench coat dress by Canadian label, Nonie, which she has worn to many a royal engagement. It’s always great to see our style icons recycling their outfits – and really demonstrates the value of those timeless investment pieces.”

But while recycling clothes isn’t anything new for royal fans with a much tighter budget, there are certain style notes that Meghan sticks to that you can follow in order to copy her look. 

Opt for block colours

Anyone who’s been following Meghan’s fashion since she first burst onto the royal scene may have noticed that she often chooses bold colours, unlike Kate Middleton’s passion for prints. 

“Meghan often wears block colours – including black, navy, forest green and crisp white – a classic, versatile palette that complements her complexion and suits her elegant style,” agreed Rich. 

“That said, she’ll also be seen wearing pops of colour, for example pastel pink, bold purple, red, or even yellow. 

“These colours are harder to nail, but the colours that make up her more classic looks can be applied to many – monochrome is everyone’s friend.”

Customers using Stitch Fix can pick Meghan’s favourite colours when setting up their preferences if they want to get the look, as well as entering the ones they want to avoid. 

“At Stitch Fix, we’re all about that extra level of personalisation,” explained Rich. “The beauty of being styled by an expert is that we may even introduce you to colours you may not think to have tried before and open your eyes to a whole new colour palette that works for you.” 

Invest in quality brands 

Meghan’s wardrobe will no doubt have an eye-watering collective price tag, but you can still steal her style by following her method of going for quality over quantity. So which brands should you be shopping for? 

“If you’ve got the budget for it, Givenchy is the obvious choice,” advised Rich.

“A pair of Manolo’s will certainly fit the bill, too, but if you’re after something a little more affordable, the brands I recommend to my customers at Stitch Fix are definitely Whistles and Mango for a tailored look, Rag & Bone for smart, comfy basics, Ivy & Oak or Won Hundred for denim, and Ghost for evening wear.”

These versatile brands will really last – which could save you money in the long run. 

Make tailoring work for you 

Meghan has a penchant for tailored clothing, something that’s been seen in the last week as she wore a chic pair of pinstripe trousers for her interview with feminist icon Gloria Steinem. But does everyone suit the look?

“Cinched waists and peplum may not suit everyone, but a tailored approach to dressing, and wearing block colours is definitely something that everyone can have a go at – and something the stylists at Stitch Fix can help you with,” explained Rich. 

“Take her classic crisp white shirt for example – there’s a style to suit every shape, whether it’s changing up the neckline, sleeve length, shape of the body itself, material or fit.”

It doesn’t matter what shape you are either – you just need to tweak the fabrics to make them work for you. 

“Whilst she’s a fan of a buttoned shirt dress, we know this isn’t a feature that works for the curvier shape,” added Rich. 

“Try to find styles that have plenty of stretch or non-working buttons so you can avoid gaping.”

Don’t forget to accessorise

Rich has spotted that Meghan often finishes her looks with essential details that bring the whole outfit together. 

“Something simple I’ve noticed, but which is crucial to her key style, is that her accessories match her clothing in subtle ways,” he revealed. 

“For example, she’ll team an all-black outfit which has subtle green tones, with a green cross-body bag to turn the all-black outfit into something a little more special – it’s something we say all the time, but accessorising really can be all it takes.”



Black Lives Matter shooting: Gun vigilante suspect went to Trump rally

Kyle Rittenhouse, 17, allegedly opened fire during a protest over the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Police were yesterday trying to determine a motive for the incident. But sources told the Daily Express that one line of inquiry is any potential role Trump and his administration may have played in shaping his view on vigilantism.

Rittenhouse allegedly fired on protesters with an AR-15 assault rifle, killing two and seriously injuring a third.

On Tuesday night, he arrived in Kenosha after driving from his home 20 miles away.

He seemingly patrolled the streets as an armed vigilante, supposedly assisting police and protecting property.

Rittenhouse, who is said to be obsessed with law enforcement, now faces a first-degree murder charge over the deaths of Anthony Huber, 26, and a 36-year-old from Kenosha.

Police said the wounded, a 36-year-old from West Allis, Wisconsin, was expected to survive.

In January, Rittenhouse was seen at Trump’s rally in Des Moines, Iowa.

The teen is seen on TV coverage of the event standing to the left of the podium as the President spoke some 30ft away.

Trump campaign spokesman Tim Murtaugh said: “President Trump has repeatedly and consistently condemned all forms of violence. This individual had nothing to do with our campaign, and we fully support our fantastic law enforcement for their swift action in this case.”