India Pakistan war: Officials DEMAND crackdown on ‘insidious’ terrorism or risk US ties

William Todd, President Donald Trump’s pick to be the next US ambassador to Pakistan, made the statement during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee meeting yesterday. He was joined by other ranking officials such as Senator Bob Menendez, who referred to terrorism as an “insidious threat”.

Mr Todd told lawmakers the US has a strong relationship with India, which itself has clashed with Pakistan over the years due to a tense boundary the two countries share in the state of Jammu and Kashmir.

He said the US relationship with Pakistan is “always complicated and sometimes contentious” but “longstanding and important.”

He insisted the US could find a way to have positive ties with both countries.

Mr Todd said: “In terms of regional dynamics, although we have a strong relationship with India, that does not need to come at the expense of Pakistan.

“I believe that under the right conditions, we can have a strong relationship with both countries.

“Our hope is that both countries will take the necessary steps to reduce tensions and as President Trump has offered, we are prepared to facilitate dialogue if both sides request it.

READ: UK signs defence pacts with India focussing on three areas amid China and Pakistan tension

One such attack in Mumbai killed 174 and injured hundreds more in 2008, the BBC reports, when gunmen used automatic weapons and grenades on a number of city locations including hotels and a central train station.

Senator Menendez said: “For too long, this group has been able to operate in different forms over the years.

“If Pakistan wants us to take its counter-terrorism commitments seriously, it must completely eradicate this group,” according to TimesNowNews.

He added there would be other “challenges” in a relationship between the US and Pakistan, including the “treatment of religious minorities” as well as Pakistan nuclear capability.

Mr Todd added that if he were confirmed as the US ambassador to Pakistan, he would “actively engage” with the country to solve issues between them, including “the threat that nuclear weapons pose to the United States”.

He also said he would enforce human rights in the region, “particularly freedom of religion and expression.”

He referred to the Tahir Naseem – a US citizen who was killed in a Pakistani courtroom in July this year.

The US Department of State said at the time it was “outraged” by the killing.

It added: “Mr. Naseem had been lured to Pakistan from his home in Illinois by individuals who then used Pakistan’s blasphemy laws to entrap him.”



India Pakistan war: Officials DEMAND crackdown on ‘insidious’ terrorism or risk US ties

William Todd, President Donald Trump’s pick to be the next US ambassador to Pakistan, made the statement during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee meeting yesterday. He was joined by other ranking officials such as Senator Bob Menendez, who referred to terrorism as an “insidious threat”.

Mr Todd told lawmakers the US has a strong relationship with India, which itself has clashed with Pakistan over the years due to a tense boundary the two countries share in the state of Jammu and Kashmir.

He said the US relationship with Pakistan is “always complicated and sometimes contentious” but “longstanding and important.”

He insisted the US could find a way to have positive ties with both countries.

Mr Todd said: “In terms of regional dynamics, although we have a strong relationship with India, that does not need to come at the expense of Pakistan.

“I believe that under the right conditions, we can have a strong relationship with both countries.

“Our hope is that both countries will take the necessary steps to reduce tensions and as President Trump has offered, we are prepared to facilitate dialogue if both sides request it.

READ: UK signs defence pacts with India focussing on three areas amid China and Pakistan tension

One such attack in Mumbai killed 174 and injured hundreds more in 2008, the BBC reports, when gunmen used automatic weapons and grenades on a number of city locations including hotels and a central train station.

Senator Menendez said: “For too long, this group has been able to operate in different forms over the years.

“If Pakistan wants us to take its counter-terrorism commitments seriously, it must completely eradicate this group,” according to TimesNowNews.

He added there would be other “challenges” in a relationship between the US and Pakistan, including the “treatment of religious minorities” as well as Pakistan nuclear capability.

Mr Todd added that if he were confirmed as the US ambassador to Pakistan, he would “actively engage” with the country to solve issues between them, including “the threat that nuclear weapons pose to the United States”.

He also said he would enforce human rights in the region, “particularly freedom of religion and expression.”

He referred to the Tahir Naseem – a US citizen who was killed in a Pakistani courtroom in July this year.

The US Department of State said at the time it was “outraged” by the killing.

It added: “Mr. Naseem had been lured to Pakistan from his home in Illinois by individuals who then used Pakistan’s blasphemy laws to entrap him.”



UK signs defence pacts with India focussing on three areas amid China and Pakistan tension

A UK security source said Indian and British defence officials were now working closely in three areas – equipment, logistics and training. The source said a memorandum of understanding (MoU) covering military training was still in its initial stages.

It comes as thousands of Indian troops have been deployed to flashpoints on the remote Himalayan border with China and the fiercely-disputed Kashmir region where the country is still at loggerheads with Pakistan.

New Delhi has already signed similar agreements with the US, Australia, France, South Korea and Singapore and more recently with Japan.

The military training deal between the UK and India follows on from a logistics agreement and a defence and security equipment MoU which was signed last year when officials from both sides agreed to step up efforts to identify mutual defence and security capability needs and collaborate on solutions.

READ MORE: India-Pakistan war threat exposed: Reason behind terrifying conflict

The Ministry of Defence said the deal was designed to underpin the collaboration between the UK and India, strengthen their defence ties and ensure both countries are able to combat emerging threats.

A spokesman said: “By collaborating and exploiting procurement opportunities together, both nations will be able to benefit from technological and manufacturing capabilities and support long-term co-operation between their defence and security industries.”

Senior military officials from India and China met this week in a bid to defuse soaring tensions on their contested border.

A joint press release issued by the Indian government in New Delhi said that both sides had agreed to “avoid misunderstandings and misjudgements”, and “refrain from unilaterally changing the situation on the ground.”

The statement said: “The two sides also agreed to hold the seventh round of military commander-level meetings as soon as possible.”

Thousands of Indian and Chinese troops are amassed along the disputed stretch of border in the Ladakh region near Tibet.

The bitter stand-off in the remote western region erupted into a bloody hand-to-hand clash in June in which 20 Indian soldiers were killed and China suffered an unspecified number of casualties.

The nuclear-armed neighbours have not been able to agree on their 2,200-mile border, despite several rounds of talks over the years.

The two countries fought a brief but bloody border war in 1962 and distrust has occasionally led to flare-ups ever since.

A full military operation is also underway on India’s northwestern frontier with Pakistan after New Delhi imposed a crackdown in the volatile Kashmir region more than 12 months ago.



UK signs defence pacts with India focussing on three areas amid China and Pakistan tension

A UK security source said Indian and British defence officials were now working closely in three areas – equipment, logistics and training. The source said a memorandum of understanding (MoU) covering military training was still in its initial stages.

It comes as thousands of Indian troops have been deployed to flashpoints on the remote Himalayan border with China and the fiercely-disputed Kashmir region where the country is still at loggerheads with Pakistan.

New Delhi has already signed similar agreements with the US, Australia, France, South Korea and Singapore and more recently with Japan.

The military training deal between the UK and India follows on from a logistics agreement and a defence and security equipment MoU which was signed last year when officials from both sides agreed to step up efforts to identify mutual defence and security capability needs and collaborate on solutions.

READ MORE: India-Pakistan war threat exposed: Reason behind terrifying conflict

The Ministry of Defence said the deal was designed to underpin the collaboration between the UK and India, strengthen their defence ties and ensure both countries are able to combat emerging threats.

A spokesman said: “By collaborating and exploiting procurement opportunities together, both nations will be able to benefit from technological and manufacturing capabilities and support long-term co-operation between their defence and security industries.”

Senior military officials from India and China met this week in a bid to defuse soaring tensions on their contested border.

A joint press release issued by the Indian government in New Delhi said that both sides had agreed to “avoid misunderstandings and misjudgements”, and “refrain from unilaterally changing the situation on the ground.”

The statement said: “The two sides also agreed to hold the seventh round of military commander-level meetings as soon as possible.”

Thousands of Indian and Chinese troops are amassed along the disputed stretch of border in the Ladakh region near Tibet.

The bitter stand-off in the remote western region erupted into a bloody hand-to-hand clash in June in which 20 Indian soldiers were killed and China suffered an unspecified number of casualties.

The nuclear-armed neighbours have not been able to agree on their 2,200-mile border, despite several rounds of talks over the years.

The two countries fought a brief but bloody border war in 1962 and distrust has occasionally led to flare-ups ever since.

A full military operation is also underway on India’s northwestern frontier with Pakistan after New Delhi imposed a crackdown in the volatile Kashmir region more than 12 months ago.



World War 3: India deals HUGE blow to Pakistan in heated UN meeting amid border tensions

Last week, both nations accused one another of firing live rounds and violating a ceasefire along the Lone of Control boundary in the region. The issue was brought up in the 45th session of the UN Human Rights Council.

In it, Pawan Badhe, India’s first secretary of the country’s permanent mission of India in Geneva, called Pakistan “an epicentre of terrorism”.

According to an Economic Times report on proceedings, the first secretary said: “The nefarious designs of Pakistan continue in Pakistan Occupied parts of Indian Union Territories of Jammu and Kashmir and Ladakh.

“Pakistan does well when it comes to intimidation and attacks against journalists, human rights defenders and political dissidents in particular by its state machinery.”

He also hit out at Turkey and the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, both of which had supposedly made comments on the internal affairs of India.

The first secretary added: “We reject the reference made by the OIC to the Union Territory of Jammu and Kashmir which is an integral part of India.”

It is not clear what Turkey or the OIC said to have attracted this response.

Tensions have also flared between India and China in recent months following a deadly clash between forces on both sides on the Line of Actual Control (LAC) which runs serves as a boundary between them.

20 Indian soldiers were killed in the hand-to-hand clash, though the number of Chinese casualties has remained debated.

READ: India rushes supplies and ammunition to contested border as China war tensions soar

Indeed, 321 non-governmental organisations have urged the UN to crack down on human rights abuses in China.

Their statement made in an open letter to UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet, and UN Member States published by Amnesty.

The letter reads: “We are dismayed at China’s efforts to distort the mandate of the UN Human Rights Council by promoting “cooperation” over accountability, and opposing initiatives to bring scrutiny of serious rights violations and international crimes in countries around the world.

“It has sought to deny access to human rights defenders to UN premises, denounced speakers on NGO side events as ‘terrorists,’ and threatened delegates to deter them from attending UN side events on rights violations, including abuses in Xinjiang.”

China’s foreign minister Zhao Lijian responded to the letter, saying: “The groundless allegations of these organisations are not worth refuting,” according to CNS News.

China has been part of the HRC since the council’s 2006 foundation. There are 47 seats altogether.



World War 3: India deals HUGE blow to Pakistan in heated UN meeting amid border tensions

Last week, both nations accused one another of firing live rounds and violating a ceasefire along the Lone of Control boundary in the region. The issue was brought up in the 45th session of the UN Human Rights Council.

In it, Pawan Badhe, India’s first secretary of the country’s permanent mission of India in Geneva, called Pakistan “an epicentre of terrorism”.

According to an Economic Times report on proceedings, the first secretary said: “The nefarious designs of Pakistan continue in Pakistan Occupied parts of Indian Union Territories of Jammu and Kashmir and Ladakh.

“Pakistan does well when it comes to intimidation and attacks against journalists, human rights defenders and political dissidents in particular by its state machinery.”

He also hit out at Turkey and the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, both of which had supposedly made comments on the internal affairs of India.

The first secretary added: “We reject the reference made by the OIC to the Union Territory of Jammu and Kashmir which is an integral part of India.”

It is not clear what Turkey or the OIC said to have attracted this response.

Tensions have also flared between India and China in recent months following a deadly clash between forces on both sides on the Line of Actual Control (LAC) which runs serves as a boundary between them.

20 Indian soldiers were killed in the hand-to-hand clash, though the number of Chinese casualties has remained debated.

READ: India rushes supplies and ammunition to contested border as China war tensions soar

Indeed, 321 non-governmental organisations have urged the UN to crack down on human rights abuses in China.

Their statement made in an open letter to UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet, and UN Member States published by Amnesty.

The letter reads: “We are dismayed at China’s efforts to distort the mandate of the UN Human Rights Council by promoting “cooperation” over accountability, and opposing initiatives to bring scrutiny of serious rights violations and international crimes in countries around the world.

“It has sought to deny access to human rights defenders to UN premises, denounced speakers on NGO side events as ‘terrorists,’ and threatened delegates to deter them from attending UN side events on rights violations, including abuses in Xinjiang.”

China’s foreign minister Zhao Lijian responded to the letter, saying: “The groundless allegations of these organisations are not worth refuting,” according to CNS News.

China has been part of the HRC since the council’s 2006 foundation. There are 47 seats altogether.



World War 3 fears rocket after India storms out of Pakistan meeting over Kashmir dispute

The virtual meeting featured security aides from Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) member states. India’s delegation, led by national security advisor Ajit Doval, quit the event after Pakistani representatives displayed a map depicting disputed territory as belonging to Islamabad.

The Pakistani map showed all of Kashmir, the sovereignty of which is hotly contested, as being under their authority.

According to the Times of India the New Delhi team dropped out of the event after seeing the Pakistani flag.

Muslim majority Kashmir is currently divided between Indian and Pakistani zones.

Since 1989 an armed insurgency has been taking place in Kashmir against Indian control.

Up to 100,000 are estimated to have been killed in the conflict.

The SCO meeting, which incorporates a number of regional powers, was being chaired by Russia.

The Russian delegation tried to persuade their Pakistani counterparts to remove the map but without success.

In August Imran Khan, the Pakistani prime minister, released a new map showing the entirety of Kashmir under the control of Pakistan.

READ MORE: Pakistan-India crisis unravels after military attacks in Kashmir

Pakistani officials, quotes in local media, claimed the row began after their envoys rejected India’s “spurious claims” over the territory.

India and Pakistan have fought three wars, in 1947, 1965 and 1999, over the control of Kashmir.

The two nuclear armed rivals also battled against each other in 1971 during Bangladesh’s ‘liberation war’ from Islamabad.

According to an Indian source after the event Nikolai Patrushev, who runs Russia’s national security council, spoke out against the Pakistani action.

It is reported to have said: “Russia does not support what Pakistan has done and hopes that Pakistan’s provocative act will not affect India’s participation in SCO.”

From March to April 2019 several people were killed in a series of skirmishes along the India-Pakistan border.

The violence began when Indian forces bombed Jaish-e-Mohammed, an extreme Islamist group it blamed for suicide attacks, over the Pakistani border.

Pakistani and Indian aircraft then staged a series of incursions into each other’s air space.

On February 27 an Indian MiG-21 warplane was shot down over Pakistan.

The pilot, Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman, was captured and later released.

Next month both India and Pakistan agreed a deal to reduce tensions between the two countries.



World War 3 fears rocket after India storms out of Pakistan meeting over Kashmir dispute

The virtual meeting featured security aides from Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) member states. India’s delegation, led by national security advisor Ajit Doval, quit the event after Pakistani representatives displayed a map depicting disputed territory as belonging to Islamabad.

The Pakistani map showed all of Kashmir, the sovereignty of which is hotly contested, as being under their authority.

According to the Times of India the New Delhi team dropped out of the event after seeing the Pakistani flag.

Muslim majority Kashmir is currently divided between Indian and Pakistani zones.

Since 1989 an armed insurgency has been taking place in Kashmir against Indian control.

Up to 100,000 are estimated to have been killed in the conflict.

The SCO meeting, which incorporates a number of regional powers, was being chaired by Russia.

The Russian delegation tried to persuade their Pakistani counterparts to remove the map but without success.

In August Imran Khan, the Pakistani prime minister, released a new map showing the entirety of Kashmir under the control of Pakistan.

READ MORE: Pakistan-India crisis unravels after military attacks in Kashmir

Pakistani officials, quotes in local media, claimed the row began after their envoys rejected India’s “spurious claims” over the territory.

India and Pakistan have fought three wars, in 1947, 1965 and 1999, over the control of Kashmir.

The two nuclear armed rivals also battled against each other in 1971 during Bangladesh’s ‘liberation war’ from Islamabad.

According to an Indian source after the event Nikolai Patrushev, who runs Russia’s national security council, spoke out against the Pakistani action.

It is reported to have said: “Russia does not support what Pakistan has done and hopes that Pakistan’s provocative act will not affect India’s participation in SCO.”

From March to April 2019 several people were killed in a series of skirmishes along the India-Pakistan border.

The violence began when Indian forces bombed Jaish-e-Mohammed, an extreme Islamist group it blamed for suicide attacks, over the Pakistani border.

Pakistani and Indian aircraft then staged a series of incursions into each other’s air space.

On February 27 an Indian MiG-21 warplane was shot down over Pakistan.

The pilot, Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman, was captured and later released.

Next month both India and Pakistan agreed a deal to reduce tensions between the two countries.



World War 3: Pakistan truce violations at 17-year record high in support of China

China and India have been in an ongoing military standoff which has rapidly increase since June when 20 Indian soldiers were killed. Figures from India’s parliament show how Pakistan has violated ceasefire agreements across the Line of Control (LoC) at a record high level.

Pakistan has beaten all annual records for the last 17 years in the first nine months of this year.

India’ parliament said 242 incidents of “cross-border firing” took place along the border with Jammu and Kashmir between January and August.

Indian Army records also revealed that the total number of Ceasefire Violations along the LoC was 972 in 2017 and 1,629 in 2018.

The number rocketed up to 3,168 in 2019.

But India has already recorded 3,186 Ceasefire Violations along the LoC from January to September this year.

Pakistan has increased its military force since Indian troops and China’s People’s Liberation Army soldiers’ clashes have escalated from May.

A senior Indian Army officer told The Times of India: “Pakistan is obviously supporting its ‘iron brother’ China.

“It also wants to push as many terrorists and arms as possible into Jammu and Kashmir before the mountain passes get blacked with snow.

READ MORE: Indian and Pakistani troops clash as global tension soar

But India has also had to hold its ground along the LoC with Pakistan.

Indian troops have been permanently deployed in camps, bunkers and posts along the LoC as well as in the hinterland for counter attacks.

Another Indian officer told The Times of India: “If China wants to turn the LAC into something like the LoC, with stepped-up permanent troop deployments and posts, we are ready.

“Yes, it will be tough and expensive. But troops are used to the harsh climate and terrain, unlike the PLA.”

The LAC stretches 3,488km from Ladakh to Arunachal Pradesh.

The LoC runs on a 778km border along Jammu and Kashmir.

Indian troops have also been deployed on most of the dominating heights in the Siachen Glacier-Saltoro Ridge region since 1984.

India launched Operation Meghdoot, in the highest battlefield in the world, pre-empting a similar move by Pakistan.

Indian forces gained control of the entire Siachen Glacier after the operation.

The Indian Army is the first army in the world to have taken tanks and other heavy military equipment up to an extremely high altitude above 5,000m.



World War 3: Pakistan truce violations at 17-year record high in support of China

China and India have been in an ongoing military standoff which has rapidly increase since June when 20 Indian soldiers were killed. Figures from India’s parliament show how Pakistan has violated ceasefire agreements across the Line of Control (LoC) at a record high level.

Pakistan has beaten all annual records for the last 17 years in the first nine months of this year.

India’ parliament said 242 incidents of “cross-border firing” took place along the border with Jammu and Kashmir between January and August.

Indian Army records also revealed that the total number of Ceasefire Violations along the LoC was 972 in 2017 and 1,629 in 2018.

The number rocketed up to 3,168 in 2019.

But India has already recorded 3,186 Ceasefire Violations along the LoC from January to September this year.

Pakistan has increased its military force since Indian troops and China’s People’s Liberation Army soldiers’ clashes have escalated from May.

A senior Indian Army officer told The Times of India: “Pakistan is obviously supporting its ‘iron brother’ China.

“It also wants to push as many terrorists and arms as possible into Jammu and Kashmir before the mountain passes get blacked with snow.

READ MORE: Indian and Pakistani troops clash as global tension soar

But India has also had to hold its ground along the LoC with Pakistan.

Indian troops have been permanently deployed in camps, bunkers and posts along the LoC as well as in the hinterland for counter attacks.

Another Indian officer told The Times of India: “If China wants to turn the LAC into something like the LoC, with stepped-up permanent troop deployments and posts, we are ready.

“Yes, it will be tough and expensive. But troops are used to the harsh climate and terrain, unlike the PLA.”

The LAC stretches 3,488km from Ladakh to Arunachal Pradesh.

The LoC runs on a 778km border along Jammu and Kashmir.

Indian troops have also been deployed on most of the dominating heights in the Siachen Glacier-Saltoro Ridge region since 1984.

India launched Operation Meghdoot, in the highest battlefield in the world, pre-empting a similar move by Pakistan.

Indian forces gained control of the entire Siachen Glacier after the operation.

The Indian Army is the first army in the world to have taken tanks and other heavy military equipment up to an extremely high altitude above 5,000m.