Boris Johnson drops huge hint on return to frontline with future plans vow in exit speech

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On September 5, Liz Truss beat Rishi Sunak following an eight-week battle for the country’s top job. Sir Graham Brady announced that the former Foreign Secretary won 81,326 votes – 57 percent of the votes –  to the Chancellor’s 60,399, at the Queen Elizabeth II centre. She will then travel to Balmoral Castle along with Boris Johnson, where, in the former Prime Minister’s words, “the baton will be passed on”. There, Ms Truss will be formally announced as the Prime Minister before picking out her cabinet, succeeding Boris Johnson.

Mr Johnson resigned less than three years after his impressive victory in 2019, the Conservatives’ best election win since 1987. 

But today, Mr Johnson stepped out of No10 Downing Street with his wife Carrie for the final time, stating “this is it, folks”. 

However, his speech was not devoid of hinted references to what he may potentially do in the future. 

During the speech, Mr Johnson spoke of his successes: “Getting Brexit done” and the UK’s record for the fastest vaccination rollout, which were met with cheers from the crowd.

Mr Johnson said he will be supporting Ms Truss in full, “offering the most fervent support”. 

He dropped a few hints about his future plans, using metaphors, describing himself as a booster rocket that had completed its role and would disappear to an “obscure part of the Pacific”. 

It appeared he hinted towards stepping back from politics and instead suggested he’d be returning to work, picking up his “plough”. 

However, Mr Johnson also compared himself to Cincinnatus, a Roman politician who saved the state from invasion. 

After Cincinnatus’ job was complete, he relinquished his power and returned to work on his farm, or his “plough”, as Mr Johnson referenced. 

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However, in a potentially huge hint, Cincinnatus returned to politics 19 years later. 

This now fuels speculation that Mr Johnson is not finished with politics for good.   

Express.co.uk has examined what Mr Johnson could do in the meantime if indeed he does take a few years off before returning to politics.

Until 2016, when Mr Johnson became foreign secretary, the former Prime Minister wrote for the Telegraph where he earned £275,000 for his weekly column – £22,916.66 per month. 

Then in 2018, he was rehired after he resigned from his role, so Mr Johnson could potentially once again return to the paper to continue expressing his views on politics from afar. 

This is not the only lucrative writing option Mr Johnson has at his fingertips. 

According to the Bookseller, the book industry magazine, Mr Johnson could take home “north of £1 million” if he tells all and writes a memoir. 

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The Bookseller added that agents predict this hypothetical memoir could garner success abroad as well as in the UK. 

This century, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron and Theresa May also resigned during their serving term. 

Ms May has earned more than £700,000 alone this year by making speeches with Mr Johnson also finding it a lucrative avenue to stroll down earning more than £160,000 for two speeches in 2019. 

Unlike Mr Cameron who resigned from his role as MP following his stepping down as Prime Minister in 2016, Mr Johnson is still the MP for Uxbridge and South Ruislip.

Although, some wonder whether politics has truly seen the last of Mr Johnson, with the former Prime Minister stating in the House of Commons “hasta la vista, baby”, a nod to Arnold Schwarzenegger in the film Terminator.

This Spanish phrase can be translated to mean “see you later” or more literally, “until the next sighting”. 



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