Homes Under The Hammer's Lucy Alexander in Twitter rant: 'Hope Boris Johnson is listening'

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    Lucy Alexander, 48, vented her frustrations about the lack of disability access at train stations in the week, following a trip to London with her daughter Kitty who uses a wheelchair.

    The former Homes Under The Hammer star has now declared she hopes Prime Minister Boris Johnson “is listening” after a social media user called out the transport system for having “one space for wheelchair users”, making it difficult to get around.

    The person in question mused: “Lucy. I’m SICK of buses & train carriages (apart from @GWRHelp) only allowing or having space for one wheelchair user. Even if the pram space on a bus is empty, and the wheelchair space used, we can’t use pram space, but prams use wheelchair space if no wheelchair!”

    They continued: “Lucy, I also want to tell @BorisJohnson how difficult this ‘one wheelchair space’ concept on buses and trains, and use of portable ramps at train stations can make keeping a job and/or appointments a constant worry. Level train entrances & more flip up seats on trains & buses…”

    Lucy replied in view of her 26,000 followers: “Let’s hope @BorisJohnson is listening. I second that.”

    The TV regular’s comments comes after she was travelling to London with her daughter Kitty – a wheelchair user – when the presenter was left fuming as the pair were unable to get around the train station easily due to broken lifts.

    Taking to the micro-blogging site, Lucy fumed: “LIVID – Travelling with a wheelchair user shows what a s**t time they really have. Car park has non blue badge holders parking in the only 3 spaces, then lifts are broken AGAIN 2nd time this week no mention on website. 50 stairs to be carried up to make the train? #surbiton.”(sic)

    She added these train stations need to get their “s**t together” and admitted the mother and daughter duo were on there way to the BBC to discuss problems faced by those in wheelchairs.

    Lucy continued: “They offered a taxi to Wimbledon then get back on the train there .. massive hassle for a wheelchair user. All this after having already parked, paid etc. These stations need to get there s**t together soon. Funnily I’m on my way with my daughter to the BBC to discuss these probs.”(sic)

    She concluded: “Just to finish this tweet- two very lovely men carried her up the 2 huge flights in her chair & down the other side. Otherwise we would have missed our meeting today. Kitty hated every single minute of that. Can you imagine.”

    The Homes Under The Hammer star’s pal, Eamonn Holmes, 58, offered his support to the star and admitted he couldn’t believe these issues are still taking place.

    He replied: “We need to get a debate going on this. I would have thought awareness of this sort of plight wouldn’t need to be raised.

    “Sadly, how wrong am I.”

    Fans were also in agreement with the star about the lack of accessibility.

    One person said: “When I broke my leg last year and had a frame on I couldn’t believe how badly accessible things are. I don’t know how people who have to use a wheelchair or crutches manage to keep patient.”

    Another person commented: “Total disgrace. I thought everywhere was supposed to be disabled friendly. Poor girl, absolutely awful.”

    While a third person added: “I hear you Lucy I’m a wheel chair user also it can be a nightmare travelling.”

    The BBC favourite has previously spoken out about her daughter Kitty’s condition – Transverse Myelitis – which caused her immune system to attack her spinal cord and now has to use a wheelchair.

    Speaking exclusively to Express.co.uk about her daughter’s diagnosis, she said: “It was a real shock when she became ill at the age of seven.

    “It was an instant illness that attacked her spinal cord.”

    “There was no precondition, nothing. It was just out of the blue,” the mother-of-two said.

    Homes Under The Hammer airs weekdays on BBC One at 10am.

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