Japan weather: Region on alert for further storms as deadly Typhoon Krosa makes landfall

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    Typhoon Krosa was downgraded to a tropical depression, but upgraded back to a tropical storm by the Joint Typhoon Warning Centre (JTWC) on Thursday. At least 40 people have been injured and hundreds of flights cancelled as the storm unleashes its force upon the island nation. An 82-year-old man was killed after falling from a ship amid strong winds and rough seas in Onomichi, according to The Japan Times.

    Typhoon Krosa made landfall on Thursday near Kure City in Hiroshima.

    This makes it the third tropical cyclone to make landfall across mainland Japan in as many weeks after Typhoon Francisco and Tropical Storm Nari.

    Krosa is travelling north with winds of up to 89mph (144km), the Japan Meteorological Agency said.

    Parts of the storm-hit region, including Hiroshima, are still recovering from deadly flooding last year.

    A group of 18 people, including children, who had been stranded while camping on the bank of a swollen river in Oita, were safely rescued on Thursday, the disaster management agency said.

    More than 7,000 people have moved to shelters in 21 prefectures in the western half of the Japanese archipelago.

    Bullet trains connecting Osaka and Kokura in the west were suspended on Thursday, and hundreds of domestic flights grounded.

    More than 2,500 homes had lost power after the storm made landfall, according to the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry.

    The typhoon is losing strength and is expected to become a tropical storm by early Saturday, but is still expected to dump large amounts of rain, with up to four feet (1.2 meters) predicted.

    Meanwhile, Accuweather meteorologists are monitoring the West Pacific for potential tropical development throughout the next week.

    The first area is located from Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands westward into the Philippine Sea.

    There are signs that this feature may strengthen prior to reaching other locations in eastern Asia later in the week.

    However, this forecast is not certain at this stage, with other potential outcomes showing it may not develop at all.

    The second area of concern is located farther east near the international dateline in the Central Pacific.

    AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Jason Nicholls said: “An area of disturbed weather southwest of Hawaii will drift westward across the dateline and could strengthen into a tropical depression or storm as it approaches Wake Island late this weekend and early next week.”

    An eventual track toward Japan is possible during the final week of August; however, the storm may also be swept into a larger non-tropical system prior to reaching Japan and be pulled northward over the open North Pacific.

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