Outrage as New York Times article attacks Queen's 'bloody history' moments after death

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‌At 6.30pm on Thursday, the Royal Family announced: “The Queen died peacefully at Balmoral this afternoon. The King and The Queen Consort will remain at Balmoral this evening and will return to London tomorrow.” Shortly after, The New York Times came under fire for promoting an article which claimed Queen Elizabeth II “helped obscure a bloody history of decolonisation”.

On Thursday, the US publication published an opinion piece which claimed that the former monarch put a “traditionalist front” on “decades of violent upheaval”.

It was published at 9.10pm, just shy of three hours after the Queen’s death was announced to the public.

The article, written by Maya Jasanoff, a professor of history at Harvard University, went on to reflect on how people “may never learn what the Queen did or didn’t know about the crimes committed in her name”.

Ms Jasanoff’s article acknowledged that the Queen “embodied a profound, sincere commitment to her duties” but added: “By design as much as by the accident of her long life, her presence as head of state and head of the Commonwealth, an association of Britain and its former colonies, put a stolid traditionalist front over decades of violent upheaval.

“As such, the Queen helped obscure a bloody history of decolonisation whose proportions and legacies have yet to be adequately acknowledged.”

David McMurtrie, head of UK publishing at Google, said on Twitter: “Totally inappropriate to publish this today, we should be mourning the passing of a great Monarch, cultural icon and one of the most amazing women who ever lived

Emily Sheffield, Evening Standard columnist, said: “The Queen has barely been announced dead and already the New York Times publishes this piece reminding: ‘The queen helped obscure a bloody history of decolonization whose proportions and legacies have yet to be adequately acknowledged.’ I mean, maybe wait 24 hours?”

Robert Colvile, director of the Centre for Policy Studies, simply said: “On this day. On this one day. Please just don’t.”

Ryan Bourne, R. Evan Scharf Chair for the Public Understanding of Economics at Cato Institute, added the New York Times was “an appalling newspaper filled consumed by anti-British sentiment” with “no class”.

READ MORE: Royal Family LIVE: Charles cheered as he speaks to mourners

David McMurtrie, head of UK publishing at Google, said on Twitter: “Totally inappropriate to publish this today, we should be mourning the passing of a great Monarch, cultural icon and one of the most amazing women who ever lived

Emily Sheffield, Evening Standard columnist, said: “The Queen has barely been announced dead and already the New York Times publishes this piece reminding: ‘The queen helped obscure a bloody history of decolonization whose proportions and legacies have yet to be adequately acknowledged.’ I mean, maybe wait 24 hours?”

Robert Colvile, director of the Centre for Policy Studies, simply said: “On this day. On this one day. Please just don’t.”

Ryan Bourne, R. Evan Scharf Chair for the Public Understanding of Economics at Cato Institute, added the New York Times was “an appalling newspaper filled consumed by anti-British sentiment” with “no class”.

It comes as King Charles III and the Queen Consort Camilla arrived at Buckingham Palace just after 2pm.

Charles was kissed on the face by a mourner as he spent 10 minutes greeting members of the public who had gathered to greet him.

The King will hold an audience with Prime Minister Liz Truss and pre-record a televised address to the nation, which will be broadcast at around 6pm.

The Queen’s coffin will depart Balmoral estate in the coming days for the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh.

It will then be taken in procession to St Giles’ Cathedral, where the Queen will lie at rest for 24 hours, allowing the public to view her coffin, before moving to London.

The Queen will then lie in state in Westminster Hall for about four days before her funeral, allowing members of the public to file past and pay their respects.

Finally, the Queen’s state funeral is expected to take place at Westminster Abbey in less than two weeks, with exact day to be confirmed by Buckingham Palace.



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